The 2016 Tribal Art London

Tribal Art London, Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1, 1st– 4th September 2016

Jeremy Sabine A 19th century Zulu wooden vessel carved from a single block of wood with no joins, half a metre tall

Jeremy Sabine
A 19th century Zulu wooden vessel carved from a single block of wood with no joins, half a metre tall

Here is a selection of items for sale at this year’s Tribal Art London fair which features twenty two international dealers and is the only specialist fair of its kind in the UK.

Arjmand Aziz A contemporary work interpreting the Songlines traced by women making their way to the important Western Desert Ancestral site of Munni Munni, by Marlene Young Nungurrayi, born 1971

Arjmand Aziz
A contemporary work interpreting the Songlines traced by women making their way to the important Western Desert Ancestral site of Munni Munni, by Marlene Young Nungurrayi, born 1971

 

David Malik A powerfully abstract mbulu ngulu reliquary figure of the Kota people, Gabon, West Africa

David Malik
A powerfully abstract mbulu ngulu reliquary figure of the Kota people, Gabon, West Africa

 

Kapil Jariwala A remarkable Peruvian tapestry surviving from the middle centuries of the first millennia, woven from alpaca wool and cotton, made by the people of the Chimu culture of Lambayeque, on the Northern coast of Peru

Kapil Jariwala
A remarkable Peruvian tapestry surviving from the middle centuries of the first millennia, woven from alpaca wool and cotton, made by the people of the Chimu culture of Lambayeque, on the Northern coast of Peru

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bryan Reeves An early hyena mask from Bambara, Mali

Bryan Reeves
An early hyena mask from Bambara, Mali

 

Marcuson & Hall A rare sleeping mat depicting trains, carriages and people woven by the Yombe, Democratic Republic of Congo

Marcuson & Hall
A rare sleeping mat depicting trains, carriages and people woven by the Yombe, Democratic Republic of Congo

tribalartlondon.com

Illumination of the Written and Scientific Kind

COLOUR: The Art and Science of Illuminated Manuscripts, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, until 30th December 2016

Historiated initial from an Antiphoner, St Lawrence holding a palm branch, the gridiron and a book (c. 1390) Don Silvestro dei Gherarducci, Niccolo Rosselli, Cenni di Francesco di Ser Cenni Florence, Italy © The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Historiated initial from an Antiphoner, St Lawrence holding a palm branch, the gridiron and a book (c. 1390) Don Silvestro dei Gherarducci, Niccolo Rosselli, Cenni di Francesco di Ser Cenni Florence, Italy
© The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

In this the Museum’s bicentenary year visitors have a wonderful opportunity to learn and understand more about the world of Illuminated Manuscripts. The exhibition combines the art of the original creators of these works with up-to-the minute research into the technique and ingredients used. Some one hundred and fifty manuscripts and fragments, with many of the exhibits being drawn from the Museum’s own collection, are displayed and date from the tenth to the sixteenth centuries. Those from the Viscount Fitzwilliam Founder’s bequest cannot be loaned out to other museums.

Book of Hours c. 1480 – c. 1490 Illuminated by Vante di Gabriello di Vante Attavanti (active c. 1480 – 1485) Florence, Italy © The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Book of Hours c. 1480 – c. 1490 Illuminated by Vante di Gabriello di Vante Attavanti (active c. 1480 – 1485) Florence, Italy
© The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Over the last four years research has covered many interesting facts such as the use of smalt (ground blue glass) on a Venetian illumination book indicates that the artist had contact with the nearby glass-makers on the island of Murano and interestingly enough it pre-dates the use of smalt by Venetian artists by fifty years. It has been discovered that egg yolk, more usually associated with artists working on panel who used it as a binder, was also sometimes used in the production of these ravishing manuscripts.

Historiated initial from a Gradual, Louis XII healing the sick (c. 1500) Paris, Northern France © The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Historiated initial from a Gradual, Louis XII healing the sick (c. 1500) Paris, Northern France
© The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

The exhibition takes us to the artistic centres where they were created in Europe and also dispels the belief that most manuscripts were produced by monks since from the eleventh century scribes and professional artists were involved in the production of manuscripts.  It also looks at later alterations to manuscripts and how some have been faked in later times.

The Macclesfield Psalter c. 1330 – 1340 The Anointing of David East Anglia (probably Norwich), England © The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

The Macclesfield Psalter c. 1330 – 1340 The Anointing of David East Anglia (probably Norwich), England
© The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

It is a revealing and fascinating exhibition that draws (no pun intended) the viewer in and allows them to understand the magnificent, rich and colourful world of Illuminated Manuscripts.

Miniature, Pentecost showing the Virgin surrounded by the twelve apostles. Hainaut, Valenciennes, circa 1480-1490. Marmion, Simon (follower or assistant of). © The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Miniature, Pentecost showing the Virgin surrounded by the twelve apostles. Hainaut, Valenciennes, circa 1480-1490. Marmion, Simon (follower or assistant of).
© The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/

Historiated initial mounted within a roundel with medallion scenes, John the Baptist, Hermit Saints and scenes of Christ’s Passion. Bologna, Parma, Italy, 1490-1500. © The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Historiated initial mounted within a roundel with medallion scenes, John the Baptist, Hermit Saints and scenes of Christ’s Passion. Bologna, Parma, Italy, 1490-1500.
© The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

 

 

Throwing light on Art

TM Lighting

(Before) The East Gallery, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust). Photo Paul Barker © Paul Barker

(Before) The East Gallery, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust).
Photo Paul Barker © Paul Barker

 

(After)The East Gallery, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust). Photo Mike Fear © The National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

(After)The East Gallery, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust).
Photo Mike Fear © The National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

 

 

 

 

Visitors to Waddesdon Manor this year will notice that the paintings have been re-lit most effectively and this is due to the specialist lighting company TM Lighting who have worked on this project. Founded in 2012 by Andrew Molyneux and Harry Triggs who have twenty years combined experience in lighting design, TM Lighting can transform homes and commercial spaces showing them to greater advantage.  Their approach takes into account both the current energy-saving legislation and the environmental factors of the space they are lighting.

Private Commissions: Marcus Lyon’s Studio

Private Commissions: Marcus Lyon’s Studio

The company provides a bespoke service using the very latest LED technology to achieve the correct light distribution which as these images confirm works wonderfully well in bringing both the art and the rooms into focus. Miranda Rock, Guardian of Burghley House, says of their work in lighting the notable collection of paintings at Burghley that “they are not over-lit and the atmosphere of the house has not been compromised”. LED bulbs are cooler than halogen ones and last much longer.

Burghley House

Burghley House

 

New Masters Exhibition by Darwin, Sinke & Van Tongeren at Jamb and exclusively lit by TM Lighting CREDIT: Ilvy Njiokiktjien

New Masters Exhibition by Darwin, Sinke & Van Tongeren at Jamb and exclusively lit by TM Lighting
CREDIT: Ilvy Njiokiktjien

Among other clients TM lighting have worked for are Weston Park House, Apsley House, the National Gallery, Goodwood, Hampton Court Palace and Armourers’ Hall. They also work with private collectors, dealers and other commercial businesses.  I hope you will agree that they are really rather good at what they do.

Commercial Commission: Fera at Claridges Hotel

Commercial Commission: Fera at Claridges Hotel

 

Apsley House

Apsley House

 

 

 

 

tmlighting.com

 

 

 

(Before) The Dining Room, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust). Photo Mike Fear © The National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

(Before) The Dining Room, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust).
Photo Mike Fear © The National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

 

(After) The Dining Room, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust). Photo Mike Fear © The National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

(After) The Dining Room, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust).
Photo Mike Fear © The National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

BBC Faces of Comedy

BBC Faces of Comedy, Compton Verney, Warwickshire, CV35 9HZ, until 2nd October 2016

Victoria Woods Sketch Show Story, Julia Walters (Mrs Overall) Duncan Preston (Mr. Clifford) Victoria Wood (Bertha) Celia Imrie (Miss Babs), 2001, Copyright BBC

Victoria Woods Sketch Show Story,
Julie Walters (Mrs Overall) Duncan Preston (Mr. Clifford) Victoria Wood (Bertha) Celia Imrie (Miss Babs), 2001,
Copyright BBC

To some extent this exhibition is a curtain raiser for a landmark sitcom season that the BBC will be airing across BBC One, BBC Two and BBC Four later in the year.

The Goon Show, Harry Secombe, Peter Sellers and Spike Milligan, 1956 Copyright BBC

The Goon Show,
Harry Secombe, Peter Sellers and Spike Milligan, 1956
Copyright BBC

This exhibition which has been guest curated by Paul Merton (Have I Got News for You) and Adil Ray (Citizen Khan) features nearly one hundred images garnered from the BBC photo library from the 1950s onward with many familiar faces.  It’s great fun and will appeal to many whatever their own sense of humour.

Absolutely Fabulous, Jane Horrocks and Joanna Lumley, 2001, Copyright BBC

Absolutely Fabulous,
Jane Horrocks and Joanna Lumley, 2001,
Copyright BBC

http://www.comptonverney.org.uk

Steptoe and Son, Harry H. Corbett as Harold Steptoe, Wilfrid Brambell as Albert Steptoe & Duncan Wood with various cast members & studio crew, 1965, Copyright BBC

Steptoe and Son,
Harry H. Corbett as Harold Steptoe, Wilfrid Brambell as Albert Steptoe & Duncan Wood with various cast members & studio crew, 1965,
Copyright BBC

Fifties Britain

Britain in the Fifties: Design and Aspiration, Compton Verney, Warwickshire, CV35 9HZ, until 2nd October 2016

Festival of Britain Colour Lithograph Poster © Estate of Abram Games

Festival of Britain Colour Lithograph Poster
© Estate of Abram Games

What a decade it was! Opening with the Festival of Britain in 1951 which played an important role in the fashioning of a new Britain which was recovering and rebuilding itself after the Second World War. The exhibition views the decade through the eyes of a fictional young couple who were setting out in life together and aptly starts with the Festival of Britain itself and goes on to look at various aspects of daily life.

The Experimental House Allesley Village designed in 1958 by Geoffrey Salmon for JM Austin Smith Photographer unknown

The Experimental House Allesley Village designed in 1958 by Geoffrey Salmon for JM Austin Smith
Photographer unknown

Focusing on housing it considers both exterior and interior design. Famous design names such as Lucienne Day, Robert Welch and Terence Conran, as well as Sanderson, Ercol and Whiteleaf whose distinctive designs were finding customers at home and overseas are included. Home technology grew too with labour-saving electrical devices for the kitchen such as washing machines and food mixers.  By 1954 Rationing had ended and by relaxing Hire Purchase controls consumers were able to buy such “luxuries” as a television and indeed by 1956 over half the TV sets were being bought on HP. The British Film Industry flourished with home-grown stars such as Diana Dors and Dirk Bogarde and with films like Bridge on the River Kwai and The Dam Busters attracting audiences both at home and abroad. The decade saw the final flourish of Britain as a place to spend a holiday although this declined in the 1960s as package holidays really took off.

1956, Campden Toastrack, box & Design Centre kitemark label © Robert Welch Designs Ltd

1956, Campden Toastrack, box & Design Centre kitemark label
© Robert Welch Designs Ltd

Southend Beach 1950s © Southend Museums Service

Southend Beach 1950s
© Southend Museums Service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The late 50s were a time of economic prosperity and 1959 was both its apogee and also the herald of the 60s.  It is an era best summed up the words of Prime Minister Harold Macmillan who said “Go around the country, go to the industrial towns, go to the farms and you will see a state of prosperity such as we have never had in my lifetime …most of our people have never had it so good.”

Wallpaper design 'Wrappings' kingfisher red Image courtesy of Sanderson

Wallpaper design ‘Wrappings’ kingfisher red Image courtesy of Sanderson

This exhibition, set against colours of the period, will be both nostalgic to those who lived through it while also being informative and intriguing to newer generations and it is one that I heartily recommend.  It depicts a very different, dare I say, friendlier world and one where the new designs of that time still have appeal to a modern day audience.

1965 ercol catalogue, showing a 1950s 308 ercol Folding occasional table Reproduced by kind permission of ercol

1965 ercol catalogue, showing a 1950s 308 ercol Folding occasional table
Reproduced by kind permission of ercol

http://www.comptonverney.org.uk

Image of Mobiles fabric ref. 220035 Image courtesy of Sanderson, www.sanderson-uk.com

Image of Mobiles fabric ref. 220035
Image courtesy of Sanderson, http://www.sanderson-uk.com

Three Cs – ‘Capability’, Coventry, Croome

‘Expect the Unexpected’, Croome Court, near High Green, Worcester, Worcestershire, WR8 9DW

The south front of the house seen across the lake at Croome Court Credit: Andrew Butler

The south front of the house seen across the lake at Croome Court
Credit: Andrew Butler

What a lovely co-incidence that in this ‘Capability’ Brown’s 300th Anniversary year I am fortunate enough to be able to write about Croome Court which as well as being Brown’s first major commission was a complete project due to the fact that he was asked in 1751 by the 6th Earl of Coventry to create a house and estate that would be the dernier cri.  The photographs show the resulting building and landscape. Although the outside design and some of the interiors are Brown’s work the Earl later commissioned Robert Adam to design some of the rooms – the Long Gallery, the Library and Tapestry Room.

The Original tapestry Room Credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Original tapestry Room
Credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Tapestry Room, now in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, featured a specially commissioned set of Gobelins tapestries and seat covers. Coventry was one of the great 18th century English collectors of Vincennes and Sèvres porcelains and he asked Adam to design a tripod stand to hold a Sevres jug and basin whose colours reflected those of the room.

Artist Will Datson with ‘Chair Play’ and two of the original chairs Credit: Jack Nelson

Artist Will Datson with ‘Chair Play’ and two of the original chairs
Credit: Jack Nelson

In1948 the family disposed of the house and many of its contents were sold by auction and thus nowadays only about twenty percent of the collection remains.  There are plans to bring these pieces back to the house later this year. The National Trust bought the park in 1996 and started on its restoration and in 2007 the house was purchased by the Croome Heritage Trust and they have granted a long lease to the National Trust.

‘Chair Play’ in the Entrance Hall Credit: Jack Nelson

‘Chair Play’ in the Entrance Hall
Credit: Jack Nelson

Contemporary art installations have been placed in the house to evoke the idea of ‘expect the unexpected’ but are inspired by and use pieces that were originally in the house. Upon entering the building one sees the artist Will Datson’s original take on the idea of hall chairs through his 2.5 metre high installation. He says of it “It was my task to display the original hall chairs in a new way. We all see chairs every day, and usually ignore them, so I’ve attempted to create something out-of-the-ordinary, dramatic and playful, that’s hard to ignore.”

The ‘Golden Box’ in the Dining Room at Croome Credit: Jack Nelson

The ‘Golden Box’ in the Dining Room at Croome
Credit: Jack Nelson

In the dining room, whose plasterwork was painted by members of the Hare Krishna Movement who used the house as their headquarters (1979-84), visitors are confronted by a 2 metre high golden box which contains beautiful examples of Meissen, Worcester and Sèvres porcelains from Croome’s remarkable collection which have been installed by the noted artist Bouke de Vries to form a dazzling ceramics treasury. He simply sums it up saying “It’s been extraordinary to work on this project with the amazing team at Croome”.

Artist Bouke de Vries making the final finishing touches to the ‘Golden Box’ Credit: Jack Nelson

Artist Bouke de Vries making the final finishing touches to the ‘Golden Box’
Credit: Jack Nelson

In the Lord’s Dressing Room you will discover two 18th century Adam-style commodes made for the house by the celebrated firm of Mayhew & Ince who also supplied the seat furniture for the Tapestry Room.  It is worth remembering that the 6th Earl also bought French furniture for Croome in Paris from A la Couronne d’Or, the shop of the renowned marchand-mercier Simon-Philippe Poirier. There is also a portrait of Barbara St John, the Earl’s second wife.

Beautifully crafted 18th century Adamesque commodes with the portrait of Barbara St John in the background. Credit: Jack Nelson

Beautifully crafted 18th century Adamesque commodes with the portrait of Barbara St John in the background.
Credit: Jack Nelson

While Croome’s Tapestry Room is now bare of its glorious contents it inspired the idea of bringing Grayson Perry’s tapestries ‘The Vanity of Small Differences’ to Croome (until 11th September 2016). The six large-scale works, inspired by Hogarth’s A Rake’s Progress, tell the story of Tim Rakewell and many of the people and things depicted reflect events that Perry encountered in his life. A 1994 earthenware vase by Perry, entitled Spirit Jar is also on show.

Visitors looking at the Grayson Perry Tapestries Credit: Peter Young

Visitors looking at the Grayson Perry Tapestries
Credit: Peter Young

‘Capability’ Brown and the Earl had become friends and thirty years after he started his transformation at Croome he still visited there and indeed Croome was described as his ‘first and most favourite child’.

Visitors looking at the Grayson Perry Tapestries Credit: Peter Young

Visitors looking at the Grayson Perry Tapestries
Credit: Peter Young

In 1783 Brown died while on his way home from dining with the Earl at his London residence. The Earl had a monument erected in Brown’s memory and it bears the inscription:

To the Memory of Lancelot Brown

Who by the powers of his inimitable and creative genius formed this garden scene out of a morass.

The Coade stone monument to Lancalot "Capability" Brown by the lake at Croome Court.The memorial was erected in 1797 following the death of Brown in 1783.

The Coade stone monument to Lancalot “Capability” Brown by the lake at Croome Court.The memorial was erected in 1797 following the death of Brown in 1783.

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/croome

Inside the Golden Box is an amazing collection of porcelain Credit: Jack Nelson

Inside the Golden Box is an amazing collection of porcelain
Credit: Jack Nelson

For those of you interested in learning more about the 6th Earls collection Sèvres I recommend:

THE SIXTH EARL OF COVENTRY’S PURCHASES OF SÈVRES PORCELAIN IN PARIS AND LONDON IN THE 1760s by Rosalind Savill in the French Porcelain Society Journal, Volume V 2015

A further display of porcelain in the Dining Room Credit: Peter Young

A further display of porcelain in the Dining Room
Credit: Peter Young

 

Grayson Perry (b. 1960), The Upper Class at Bay, 2012 Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London and British Council. Gift of the artist and Victoria Miro Gallery with the support of Channel 4 Television, the Art Fund and Sfumato Foundation with additional support from Alix Partners.

Grayson Perry (b. 1960), The Upper Class at Bay, 2012 Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London and British Council. Gift of the artist and Victoria Miro Gallery with the support of Channel 4 Television, the Art Fund and Sfumato Foundation with additional support from Alix Partners.

 

Croome Court Credit: David Norton

Croome Court
Credit: David Norton

A Celebration of Royal Style

Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe, Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace, until 2nd October 2016

A display of dresses from Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen's Wardrobe on display at Buckingham Palace. Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

A display of dresses from Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe on display at Buckingham Palace.
Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

This year visitors to Buckingham Palace are given an extra special treat with this exhibition. It is a wonderful way to mark The Queen’s 90th birthday and to celebrate her patronage of British fashion design from the replica of the original Christening gown worn since 1841 by succeeding members of the Royal Family to this year’s bright green outfit worn at Trooping the Colour.

Queen Elizabeth II standing in the White Drawing Room, Buckingham Palace. Official portrait by Cecil Beaton, 1968 Royal Collection Trust / (C) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

Queen Elizabeth II standing in the White Drawing Room, Buckingham Palace. Official portrait by Cecil Beaton, 1968
Royal Collection Trust / (C) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

It explores every aspect of The Queen’s official life, including the robes that she and Princess Margaret wore to their parents’ coronation, her wedding dress and Coronation gown as well as her military attire. The specially created dresses and outfits for State visits and overseas tours such as the stunning evening dress her Majesty wore to on her first state visit to Germany in 1965 and which was inspired by the rococo decoration at Schloss Bruhl reveal the care and attention that goes into the detail of such outfits each time.

A display of evening wear from Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen's Wardrobe on show at Buckingham Palace. Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

A display of evening wear from Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe on show at Buckingham Palace.
Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

Also one sees the outfits the Queen has worn for family occasions such as the wedding of Princess Anne, the Investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the celebrations of her various Jubilees.  It is a hugely colourful exhibition as so many of The Queen’s clothes are in bright, strong colours so that she is easily visible to all, especially in a crowd.  There is also the striking dress she wore in the James Bond sequence that was a highlight of the opening ceremony of the London Olympics in 2012. The corridor lined with examples of The Queen’s hats is rather a trip down memory lane as you will recognise many of them.  I must say that the song Ah, yes, I remember it well from Gigi came to mind.

Crystal and lace peach beaded cocktail dress by Angela Kelly. The dress and headpiece were worn by The Queen when she appeared in the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics with James Bond. Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

Crystal and lace peach beaded cocktail dress by Angela Kelly. The dress and headpiece were worn by The Queen when she appeared in the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics with James Bond.
Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

This display is a really happy, nostalgic and heart-warming experience that aptly reflects the life and reign of a very special lady indeed – our Queen!

A display of The Queen's hats from Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen's Wardrobe at Buckingham Palace. Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

A display of The Queen’s hats from Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe at Buckingham Palace.
Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk

A display of dresses on show at Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen's Wardrobe at the Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace, including Her Majesty's wedding dress by Sir Norman Hartnell, 1947 (far left) Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

A display of dresses on show at Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe at the Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace, including Her Majesty’s wedding dress by Sir Norman Hartnell, 1947 (far left)
Royal Collection Trust /© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016.

 

 

Please remember when purchasing a ticket that you can
Enjoy free re-admission for a year by asking us to treat your ticket purchase as a donation.
The income from your ticket contributes directly to The Royal Collection Trust, a registered charity.