Sculpture at Canary Wharf and in Victoria

Sculptures from The Ingram Collection of Modern British Art to exhibit at Canary Wharf, until 15th November

 This exhibition of bronzes comes from the collection of Modern British Art put together by media entrepreneur Chris Ingram.  Focusing on the figurative, his paintings, drawings, prints and as we see here, sculpture reflect both the evolving tale of life and also art from the 1900s to the 1960s.  It is also a story of the relationships between artist and the materials, themes and subjects they explored and created.

Jacob Epstein (1880-1959) Second Portrait of Deirde 1941-2

Jacob Epstein (1880-1959) Second Portrait of Deirde 1941-2

Numbering among the artists whose bronzes are on show are Jacob Epstein, Elisabeth Frink, Eduardo Paolozzi and Lynn Chadwick.

Elisabeth Frink (1930 - 1993) Goggle Head, 1969

Elisabeth Frink (1930 – 1993) Goggle Head, 1969

This is a show that marks a departure from the more contemporary works usually shown at Canary Wharf.  As the exhibition curator, Ann Elliott, says “Since 2001 our temporary exhibitions programme at Canary Wharf has focused largely on the work of living – mostly British – artists. It is therefore very timely to look at the work of earlier artists whose progressive, even radical ideas and unique creativity opened up more possibilities for future generations.”

Reg Butler (1913 - 1981) Woman on a Boat, 1953

Reg Butler (1913 – 1981) Woman on a Boat, 1953

They can be seen in the Lobby of One Canada Square.

www.canarywharf.com.

 

ALEX HODA: D-CONSTRUCTION, Edel Assanti, 272-274 Vauxhall Bridge Road, London SW1V 1BB,   until 26th October

Did you ever think that you would see sculptures that were scaled-up from banana skins and chewed gum? No? Well now is your chance. 

DSC_0006 

Talented sculptor Alex Hoda uses his teeth to shape the gum to the form he wants and then freezes the resulting shapes overnight.  He then scans the chosen maquettes in 3D space for their translation into marble.  A similar transformation occurs with the dry banana skins which are transformed into bronze sculptures.

DSC_0004The resulting sculptures manage to be ambiguous but familiar, classical but abstract and somewhat intriguing given the throw-away materials they come from.

www.edelassanti.com

All images are copyright

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