VERONESE: MAGNIFICENCE IN RENAISSANCE VENICE, The National Gallery & a postscript

VERONESE: MAGNIFICENCE IN RENAISSANCE VENICE, The National Gallery, London until 15th June 2014

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) Saint John the Baptist, about 1560 Oil on canvas 247 × 122 cm Galleria Estense, Modena (4188) © Courtesy of the Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo - Archivio  Fotografico della SBSAE di Modena e Reggio Emilia

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588)
Saint John the Baptist, about 1560
Oil on canvas
247 × 122 cm
Galleria Estense, Modena (4188)
© Courtesy of the Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Archivio
Fotografico della SBSAE di Modena e Reggio Emilia

This very special exhibition brings fifty paintings from around the world together to form what is the most important body of Veronese’s work ever to be seen in this country.

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) Perseus and Andromeda, 1575-80 Oil on canvas 260 × 211 cm Musée des Beaux - Arts, Rennes (1801-1-1) © MBA, Rennes, Dist. RMN/Adélaïde Beaudoin

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588)
Perseus and Andromeda, 1575-80
Oil on canvas
260 × 211 cm
Musée des Beaux – Arts, Rennes (1801-1-1)
© MBA, Rennes, Dist. RMN/Adélaïde Beaudoin

All types of his artistic output are well represented – portraits, altarpieces, allegorical decorations and mythological works – and they clearly show why he was so eagerly sought after by the Patrician classes of Venice and the Veneto. Indeed it would be invidious of me to single out particular works as this is an exhibition that needs to be seen as a whole.

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) Portrait of a Gentleman, about 1555 Oil on canvas 104.5 × 108 cm Galleria Palatina, Palazzo Pitti, Florence (216) © Soprintendenza Speciale per il Polo Museale Fiorentino

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588)
Portrait of a Gentleman, about 1555
Oil on canvas
104.5 × 108 cm
Galleria Palatina, Palazzo Pitti, Florence (216)
© Soprintendenza Speciale per il Polo Museale Fiorentino

Known as Veronese (1528–1588), he was born Paolo Caliari in Verona where his father was a stonecutter. In 1541 he entered the workshop of Antonio Badile as an apprentice (he later married Badile’s daughter) and then went on to complete commissions for secular and religious patrons in the city.

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) The Rest on the Flight into Egypt, about 1570-2 Oil on canvas 236.2 x 161.3 cm Frame: 281.3 x 205.4× 11.4 cm © Collection of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, Florida State University, Sarasota Florida (SN82)

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588)
The Rest on the Flight into Egypt, about 1570-2
Oil on canvas
236.2 x 161.3 cm Frame: 281.3 x 205.4× 11.4 cm
© Collection of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, Florida State University, Sarasota Florida (SN82

 

Veronese moved to Venice in the early 1550s where his great reputation as an artist became firmly established. His works with their combination of figures and architecture superbly represent to the modern viewer the grandeur and power of the Venetian Republic of that time.

As the National Gallery’s director, Dr Nicholas Penny aptly sums up: “From the deftly captured shimmer of a pearl, to the sweep and splendour of his architectural settings, Veronese’s mastery of colour, space and light, and his feeling for beauty, for opulence and grace, have captured the imagination of countless artists and art lovers ever since.”

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk


Postscript 

It would be wrong of me not to mention the very enjoyable exhibition entitled Catherine Goodman – Drawing from Veronese, (until 6 June 2014) at the same time.  It is being held at P. & D. Colnaghi and Co. Ltd, 15 Old Bond Street, London, W1 and is a joint exhibition with Marlborough Fine Art.

CATHERINE GOODMAN ‘Scorn’ II from ‘The Four Allegories of Love’ Charcoal and pastel on paper 48 x 62 cm  Image is copyright

CATHERINE GOODMAN
‘Scorn’ II from ‘The Four Allegories of Love’
Charcoal and pastel on paper
48 x 62 cm
Image is copyright

http://www.colnaghi.co.uk
http://www.marlboroughfineart.com

One comment on “VERONESE: MAGNIFICENCE IN RENAISSANCE VENICE, The National Gallery & a postscript

  1. Penticular says:

    I have practiced his work several times, recently , pieta 1851 ,like so many great artist of those times we have so much to learn from him. I call this study Tribute To The Italian Masters. Thank You Northern Italy for Verona.

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