The Chelsea Antiques Spring Fair

The Chelsea Antiques Spring Fair, Chelsea Old Town Hall, King’s Road, London SW3, 18– 22 March 2015
Jacques Fath by Serge Ivanoff,1940's Bagshawe Fine Art

Jacques Fath by Serge Ivanoff,1940’s
Bagshawe Fine Art

Visitors to this fair, as its organiser Caroline Penman points out,  “keep commenting how welcoming our Fair is and they admire the fact that there is a lot of choice at reasonable prices. Many locals return to the Fair for several days, but we also get a huge amount of foreign visitors, who all tend to find something to take home with them.”

A fine quality 15ct. gold amethyst and ruby bee brooch, c 1900 T Robert

A fine quality 15ct. gold amethyst and ruby bee brooch, c 1900
T Robert

Chelsea Town Hall provides the right setting for this boutique-style fair which offers a wide variety to tempt you with prices ranging from £50 up into the thousands of pounds.  This year the fair’s dateline goes up to the 1970s.  The fair is once again supporting the local charity Children’s Hospital Trust Fund.


Sergio Rodrigues, Kilin Chair, 1973  Hayloft Mid Century

Sergio Rodrigues, Kilin Chair, 1973
Hayloft Mid Century

Irish Road Bowlers attributed to Nathaniel Grogan Jnr, ca 1790 Bagshawe Fine Art

Irish Road Bowlers attributed to Nathaniel Grogan Jnr, ca 1790
Bagshawe Fine Art


The 2015 BADA Antiques & Fine Art Fair

The BADA Antiques & Fine Art Fair, The Duke of York Square, Chelsea, London SW3, 18th – 24th March2015

Flowers East 2

Edmund Clark – The Mountains of Majeed, Flowers Gallery, 82 Kingsland Road, London E2, until 4th April 2015

Edmund Clark,  The Mountains of Majeed 2, 2014  (c) Edmund Clark, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London and New York

Edmund Clark,
The Mountains of Majeed 2, 2014
(c) Edmund Clark, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London and New York

Edmund Clark is now also represented by the gallery and this exhibition reflects on the ending of ‘Operation Enduring Freedom’ in Afghanistan using photography, found imagery and Taliban poetry.

Edmund Clark,  The Mountains of Majeed 3, 2014  (c) Edmund Clark, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London and New York

Edmund Clark,
The Mountains of Majeed 3, 2014
(c) Edmund Clark, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London and New York

It is a view on the experience of many of those based at Bagram Airfield, America’s largest base in Afghanistan, who never actually engaged with the enemy. Clark thoughtfully contrasts the man-made landscape within the camp with the mountains of the Hindu Kush which dominate the horizon and landscape both within and outside the camp’s perimeter.  The surrounding landscape is reproduced in murals and landscapes within the base’s buildings and it was a particular series of paintings in a dining facility by an artist named Majeed that inspired Clark. He says of them “How many tens of thousands of pairs of western eyes have registered the pastoral peace of these mountainscapes? Has anyone considered what they say of the country they are playing a part in occupying?”

Edmund Clark,  The Mountains of Majeed 2, 2014  (c) Edmund Clark, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London and New York

Edmund Clark,
The Mountains of Majeed 2, 2014
(c) Edmund Clark, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery, London and New York

Majeed’s paintings are shown reproduced as a series of picture post cards and as Clark says of the mountains depicted in them “There is distance between these mountains. Vistas of tranquility fabricated by hand from canvas, wood and paint. Images from an enclave captured in high resolution by the latest digital technology. Two cultures divided by landscape and time. Ever present mountains forever beyond boots confined for a duration, within walls of occupation, on a ground of gravel and tarmac. And there is convergence. Both are mountains of the imagination. Both are representations of enduring freedom; and in both the mountains belong to Majeed.”

 

WWW.FLOWERSGALLERY.COM

Flowers East 1

Peter Schmersal, Flowers Gallery, 82 Kingsland Road, London E2, until 4th April 2015

Peter Schmersal,  Herbst oder die Traubernte  nach Goya, 2009  (c) Peter Schmersal, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

Peter Schmersal,
Herbst oder die Traubernte nach Goya, 2009
(c) Peter Schmersal, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

This exhibition is a double celebration for it is the artist’s first show since he joined the gallery earlier this year and his first show in the UK since 2004.
He is well-known for his exciting take on the traditional and the new. Whether still lifes, landscape portraits, including self-portraits he has his own distinctive style that can be influenced by masters such as Rubens, Baldung Grien, Goya and Ingres but have a touch of his own magic.

Peter Schmersal,  Dead Flowers, 2010,  (c) Peter Schmersal, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

Peter Schmersal,
Dead Flowers, 2010,
(c) Peter Schmersal, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

As he says “There is no way to escape the compelling potency of signs. I see little difference between the fables and tales we find in art history, and our contemporary strategies to form signs and invent symbols as comments on our current lives. I concentrate on my own observations, reflected in their translation – this is the source that generates creative initiative.”

Peter Schmersal, Ich / Papst Sixtus, 2014  (c) Peter Schmersal, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

Peter Schmersal,
Ich / Papst Sixtus, 2014
(c) Peter Schmersal, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

http://www.flowersgallery.com

Chelsea 2

‘All My Beautiful Boys’ Fran Giffard and ‘Stitched’ Flo Snook & Emma Cowlam, Northcote Gallery Chelsea, 253 King’s Road, London, SW3, until 26th March 2015

Fran Giffard A Posy Mixed Media on Moleskin Diary pages 85 x 100cm (C)

Fran Giffard
A Posy
Mixed Media on Moleskine Diary pages
85 x 100cm
(C)

There is no doubt about the appeal nature has for the artist Fran Giffard as her bird and butterfly studies amply prove. She depicts them using watercolour, gouache and graphite on the pages of her Moleskine diaries.

Emma Cowlam New York Bike Lovers,  Threadwork on paper 50 x 70cm (C)

Emma Cowlam
New York Bike Lovers,
Threadwork on paper
50 x 70cm
(C)

Upstairs, stitching is the order of the day as both Emma Cowlam and Flo Snook use drawing as a basis for their works which they then embellish with hand stitching to create very individual attractive works.

Flo Snook Seven Sisters Threadworm on linen 25 x 25cm (C)

Flo Snook
Seven Sisters
Threadworm on linen
25 x 25cm
(C)

http://www.northcotegallery.com

CHELSEA 1

Gavin Watson – Flock & Stock, Jonathan Cooper, Park Walk Gallery, 20 Park Walk, London, SW10, until 21st March 2015

Gavin Watson  Eat, Love Pray Oil on canvas Signed 28 x 32ins (50.8 x 101.6cm) (C)

Gavin Watson
Eat, Love, Prey
Oil on canvas
Signed
28 x 32ins (50.8 x 101.6cm)
(C)

This show is Gavin Watson’s first in the UK for more than twenty years as previously he had been represented by New York’s Cricket Hill Gallery.

Gavin Watson  Waiting For Dogot Oil on canvas Signed 40 x 32ins (101.6 x 81.3cm) (C)

Gavin Watson
Waiting For Dogot
Oil on canvas
Signed
40 x 32ins (101.6 x 81.3cm)
(C)

His works are inspired by the setting and history of Northumberland. The fortified tower houses, known as Bastle houses, provided shelter in troubled times for both people and their livestock and it is this idea which has provided the ideas for these present works which are charged with atmosphere and imagination.

http://www.jonathancooper.co.uk

Skarstedt

Barbara Kruger: Early Works, Skarstedt, 23 Old Bond Street, London W1, until
11th April 2015

Barbara Kruger,  Untitled (You kill time), 1983,  black and white photograph, 72 x 49 in.  © Barbara Kruger, Courtesy of the artist and Skarstedt

Barbara Kruger,
Untitled (You kill time), 1983,
black and white photograph, 72 x 49 in.
© Barbara Kruger, Courtesy of the artist and Skarstedt

These early works by the American artist Barbara Kruger date from the 1980s. The large black and white photographs have great impact, partly due to their red enamel frames but more so to the overlaid Futura type captions which help form the questions the artist poses be it about identity, power or sexuality. Kruger herself says “In my work I try to question the seemingly natural appearance of images through the textual commentary which accompanies them.”

Barbara Kruger,  Untitled (We are your circumstantial evidence), 1981,  black and white photograph,  91 1.2 x 61 1.2 in.  © Barbara Kruger, Courtesy of the artist and Skarstedt

Barbara Kruger,
Untitled (We are your circumstantial evidence), 1981,
black and white photograph, 91 1.2 x 61 1.2 in.
© Barbara Kruger, Courtesy of the artist and Skarstedt

http://www.skarstedt.com