Serpentine I

Leon Golub: Bite Your Tongue, Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2, until 17th May 2015
Leon Golub: Bite Your Tongue Installation view,  Serpentine Gallery (4 March – 17 May 2015)  Image © READS 2015

Leon Golub: Bite Your Tongue Installation view,
Serpentine Gallery (4 March – 17 May 2015)
Image © READS 2015

Leon Golub favoured a large-scale format for many of his works as can be seen in this great show which examines his work from the 1950s until his death in 2004.  He was part of the Monster Roster post-war art group that concentrated on the figurative rather than the abstract.  They were influenced by contemporary events as one sees through Golub’s work which in the 70s and 80s repeatedly visits the themes of violence and oppression reflecting American foreign policy, the Vietnam War, Latin America and South Africa.  These are powerfully engaging and thought-provoking images.
Leon Golub: Bite Your Tongue Installation view,  Serpentine Gallery (4 March – 17 May 2015)  Image © READS 2015

Leon Golub: Bite Your Tongue Installation view,
Serpentine Gallery (4 March – 17 May 2015)
Image © READS 2015

www.serpentinegalleries.org

Leon Golub: Bite Your Tongue Installation view,  Serpentine Gallery (4 March – 17 May 2015)  Image © READS 2015

Leon Golub: Bite Your Tongue Installation view,
Serpentine Gallery (4 March – 17 May 2015)
Image © READS 2015

Scream Editions

David Shillinglaw – You Are Here, Scream Editions, 27/28 Eastcastle Street, London W1, until 28th April 2015
 David Shillinglaw_PV I
The strikingly colourful work of David Shillinglaw is about people and their nature whether polite or awful, informed or just stupid.  He sums it up saying  “Life is a struggle. For everyone. From the smallest insect to the greatest beast, we are determined by the success we seek, and how, in turn we measure that success. Each of us experiencing ups and downs. Peaks and troughs. Like a game of snakes and ladders.”
David Shillinglaw_PV II
screameditions.com

An April Shower of Fairs

I thought I would share this cluster of fairs that are happening over the next ten or so days. All are well worth a visit.

 

The Chelsea Art Fair, Chelsea Old Town Hall, King’s Road, London SW3, April 16th -19th April 2015.

Faye Anderson "Bert"   8"x6" (20cmx15cm),  Egg Tempera Courtesy of Cameron Contemporary Art

Faye Anderson
“Bert”
8″x6″ (20cmx15cm),
Egg Tempera
Courtesy of Cameron Contemporary Art

This is a popular fair, which has well over thirty galleries from the UK exhibiting and is best summed up by its director Ben Cooper “Since our revamp three years ago, the Fair has gone from strength to strength and we have very much established ourselves as the London Fair which offers Londoners a fantastic selection of galleries with a variety of works which appeal to a wide range of art lovers.”

www.chelseaartfair.org

 

The London Antique Rug & Textile Art Fair 2015, The Showroom, Penfold Street, Marylebone, London NW8, 16th – 19th April 2015

Rare C19th Qashqai (Persia) bagface Owen Parry.

Rare C19th Qashqai (Persia) bagface
Owen Parry.

This jewel of a fair offers a tempting array of rugs and carpets, textiles, tapestries and tribal weavings from all over the world. Among the twelve specialist dealers are two new exhibitors – Kennedy Carpets (London) and Hagop Manoyan (New York). The intimate bazaar-like setting compliments both the rare and decorative pieces available. Just as last year the Fair will be on view online too.

www.larta.net

 

Ceramic Art London 2015, Henry Moore and Gulbenkian Galleries, The Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore, London, SW7, 17th – 19th April 2015

Barbara Hast,  Teapot and Cup,  porcelain, thrown, modeled, relief painting, 5.5 inches.  Courtesy of Ceramic Art London

Barbara Hast,
Teapot and Cup,
porcelain, thrown, modeled, relief painting, 5.5 inches.
Courtesy of Ceramic Art London

Some eighty ceramic artists from around the world will be showing here in this leading international fair. Whether you are looking for the more practical or decorative this is the place to come as you will discover both traditional and cutting-edge approaches to the making of wonderful ceramic objects. Pots rock!

http://www.ceramics.org.uk

 

Spring Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair, Battersea Evolution, Battersea Park, London SW11, 21st – 26th April 2015

c1920s sketch of a decorator’s scheme for an apartment Charles Plante Fine Arts

c1920s sketch of a decorator’s scheme for an apartment
Charles Plante Fine Arts

The Spring edition of this enduringly popular and tempting Fair has the Passementerie Garden as its Foyer Exhibition. It promises to be fun with a wide array of antique and textile trimmings. A 19th century room is being recreated by Charles Plante Fine Arts using extravagantly-trimmed curtains and textiles; a setting which will reflect his carefully chosen stock of watercolours and drawings of interiors, gardens and architecture. Who could ask for anything more?

www.decorativefair.com

 

The Other Art Fair, B1, Victoria House, Bloomsbury Square, London WC1, 23rd – 26th April 2015

Tommy Clarke 'Entry' C-type print, framed, 63.5 x 60 cm  Edition of 100

Tommy Clarke
‘Entry’
C-type print, framed, 63.5 x 60 cm
Edition of 100

The Other Art Fair (TOAF) is an interactive experience because visitors can actually speak to the artists exhibiting there and learn more about the processes involved in creating these highly individual works of art. It is a great way to introduce younger members of your family to the world of art collecting as it is in a relaxed, more informal setting than many other fairs.

theotherartfair.com

The London Original Print Fair, Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1, 23rd-26th April 2015

 Tommaso Piroli (1752–1824) after Friedrich Rehberg (1758–1835) Emma, Lady Hamilton’s ‘attitudes', plate III, 1794 Engraving and etching on ochre prepared paper, 26.3 x 20.1 cm RCIN 655736 Purchased by the Prince Regent (later George IV) from Colnaghi & Co. on 15 April 1816 for 7s 6d (for the set) Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015

Tommaso Piroli (1752–1824) after Friedrich Rehberg (1758–1835)
Emma, Lady Hamilton’s ‘attitudes’, plate III, 1794
Engraving and etching on ochre prepared paper, 26.3 x 20.1 cm
RCIN 655736
Purchased by the Prince Regent (later George IV) from Colnaghi & Co. on 15 April 1816 for 7s 6d (for the set)
Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015

This exciting fair, covering both old and contemporary,  is now in its thirtieth year a fact which is honoured by a loan exhibition of thirty prints from the Royal Collection.  As always a must for devotees of this discipline.
 James Gillray (1756–1815) A New Edition Considerably Enlarged of Attitudes Faithfully Copied from Nature, plate III 1807 Etching on blue paper 25.9 x 19.6 cm RCIN 655737 Purchased by the Prince of Wales (later George IV) from Hannah Humphrey on 24 April 1807 for 15s (for the set) Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015

James Gillray (1756–1815)
A New Edition Considerably Enlarged of Attitudes Faithfully Copied from Nature, plate III
1807
Etching on blue paper
25.9 x 19.6 cm
RCIN 655737
Purchased by the Prince of Wales (later George IV) from Hannah Humphrey on 24 April 1807 for 15s (for the set)
Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015

londonprintfair.com

Pi Artworks London

Paul Schwer – The Shape of Things to Come, Pi Artworks London, 55 Eastcastle Street, W1, until 16th May 2015
The Shape of Things to Come Installation view Courtesy of Pi Artworks and the artist

The Shape of Things to Come Installation view
Courtesy of Pi Artworks and the artist

In this exhibition, curated by Stephan Berg (Director of the Kunstmuseum Bonn) the artist takes us into a different place. Inspired by a photograph of a pergola in Istanbul the walls and ceiling of the gallery are transformed into a spatial drawing reflecting the pergola’s archway.  This is created by using black dye and fine silver lines while from the ceiling tentacles of fluorescent tubes, wires, pigmented latex and warped polyester tumble downwards creating spaces for the artist bold, colourful Plexiglas sculptures.

The Shape of Things to Come Installation view  Courtesy of Pi Artworks and the artist

The Shape of Things to Come Installation view
Courtesy of Pi Artworks and the artist

These are created by the original flat PET-G plates being painted and then transformed into other worldly three dimensional shapes through heat and pressure.  The result as you can see here is inspiring.

http://www.piartworks.com

Tiwani Contemporary

Mythopoeia: Mequitta Ahuja, Kapwani Kiwanga, Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum and Alida Rodrigues , Tiwani Contemporary, 16 Little Portland Street, London W1, until 9th May 2015
Mequitta Ahuja Journeyman II, 2015 Oil on canvas 213.36 x 203.2cm

Mequitta Ahuja
Journeyman II, 2015
Oil on canvas
213.36 x 203.2cm

This group exhibition brings together four international female artists who have responded to the idea behind the exhibition’s title – Mythopoeia. The word comes from the Greek ‘mūthopoios’ which means ‘composer of  fiction’ and in this show the artists interpret their ideas of the old traditions of storytelling and mythology in a new manner that reflect their own beliefs and ideas in this modern age.
Alida Rodrigues Sesamoides canescens, 2013 Collage 14.4 x 9.4cm

Alida Rodrigues
Sesamoides canescens, 2013
Collage
14.4 x 9.4cm

www.tiwani.co.uk

Sir John Soane and others

Building a Dialogue: the Architect and the Client, Sir John Soane’s Museum, 13 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2, until 9th May 2015

Joseph Michael Gandy Perspective of eight designs for churches, with plan 1834, Pencil, pen and ink and watercolour, 745 x 1320mm Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

Joseph Michael Gandy
Perspective of eight designs for churches, with plan
1834, Pencil, pen and ink and watercolour, 745 x 1320mm
Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

As the title suggests this exhibition examines the relationship between client (state or private) and architect over several centuries, although as one would expect it concentrates on some of Soane’s commissions including the Dulwich Picture Gallery and Marylebone’s Holy Trinity Church, which is now known as the venue One Marylebone.

Sir John Soane Perspective of the East Front of Dulwich Picture Gallery 1812, Pen and ink, and wash, 278 x 440mm Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

Sir John Soane
Perspective of the East Front of Dulwich Picture Gallery
1812, Pen and ink, and wash, 278 x 440mm
Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

While not all relationships were fraught the visitor learns how Sir Christopher Wren’s original plans for the Royal Naval Hospital were vetoed by the King as it would have meant the loss of Inigo Jones’ Queens House and of the problems Soane faced with his plans for Holy Trinity Church from both the Commissioners and the Parish.

Joseph Michael Gandy RA Lecture Drawing, Privy Council Chamber c. 1827, Pencil, pen and ink, and watercolour, 950 x 720mm Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

Joseph Michael Gandy
RA Lecture Drawing, Privy Council Chamber
c. 1827, Pencil, pen and ink, and watercolour, 950 x 720mm
Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

The exhibition also looks at how architects could “promote” their ability though published works such as The Thorpe Album from the late 16th century or The Works in Architecture of Robert and James Adam (1778). The Museum’s director Abraham Thomas says of this enjoyable show: “Architectural drawings have a profound ability to record and articulate the various design discussions that occur within an office or between an architect and a client. I’m delighted that this exhibition not only draws upon gems from the Museum’s collection of over 30,000 architectural drawings, but also reminds us that Sir John Soane’s home was the site of a busy architectural practice, embedded in the heart of the building, where such conversations happened every day. The exhibition also makes a connection between historical and contemporary contexts, by exploring the multi-faceted ways in which architects, especially Soane himself, have always engaged with, and re-defined, the notion of a ‘client’ – showing us how design ideas have continued to express themselves through the drawing process, from Soane’s time through to the present day.”

John Thorpe ‘IT’ House from the Thorpe Album c. 1580, Pen and ink, 4310 x 280mm Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

John Thorpe
‘IT’ House from the Thorpe Album
c. 1580, Pen and ink, 4310 x 280mm
Courtesy of Sir John Soane’s Museum

http://www.soane.org

BOOK REVIEW: Nothing Beats Reality

Nothing Beats Reality

Pierre Winther

teNeues

 image1

Hardcover with jacket

Text in English

€ 98 $ 125 £ 80

 

ISBN: 978-3-8327-9861-1

This book celebrates the work of the Danish-born leading photographer Pierre Winther. As the striking images in this book ably demonstrate he has a cinematic mind. They are garnered from a quarter of a century’s work for clients, including Diesel, Dunhill, Finlandia, Levi’s, Hugo Boss and Nike.

The cover image which dates from 1992 and was done without digital manipulation influenced the book’s title Nothing Beats Reality. Winther explains this choice saying “I think the narrative of the man riding a 17 feet tiger shark visually sums up my general approach to image-making, which is this balance of danger and illusion with a playful nod to the viewer. And at the same time I see the image as a hint to the title ‘Nothing Beats Reality’ and visa versa.”

teneues.com

www.pierrewinther.com

Connaught Brown

Geoff Uglow: MMXIV, Connaught Brown, 2 Albemarle Street, London W1, until 16th May 2015

Geoff Uglow,  Studio Shot, 2014.  Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

Geoff Uglow,
Studio Shot, 2014.
Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

This impressive new series of paintings will redefine your idea of the landscape in contemporary British Art for Uglow has depicted it by using a single colour for each day of one year. The colours reflect a hue he has picked up from his local landscape whether the colour of a tree’s bark or a flower petal or the effect of light on the land.

Geoff Uglow,  January, 2014,  oil on board 85 x 130 cm.  Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

Geoff Uglow,
January, 2014,
oil on board 85 x 130 cm.
Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

The grid-like pattern of the twelve panels evokes the work of Piet Mondrian and reflects the artist’s belief that there is a fundamental order in nature. He says “In nature everything seems so well designed and works so perfectly”.

Geoff Uglow,  May, 2014,  oil on board, 85 x 130 cm.  Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

Geoff Uglow,
May, 2014,
oil on board, 85 x 130 cm.
Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

However, as can be found in nature, there is slight blurring of defined lines as each “day” is thickly painted even over the edge. This is a depiction of nature that will draw you into a contemplative world of natural colour and beauty which is surely what landscapes are all about.

http://www.connaughtbrown.co.uk

Geoff Uglow,  August, 2014,  oil on board, 85 x 130 cm.  Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

Geoff Uglow,
August, 2014,
oil on board, 85 x 130 cm.
Courtesy the artist and Connaught Brown, London.

Chris Beetles Ltd

Geraldine Girvan – New Works, Chris Beetles Ltd, 8 & 10 Ryder Street, St James’s, London SW1, until 18 April 2015

GARDEN, LATE SUMMER GERALDINE GIRVAN (Born 1947) SIGNED OIL ON CANVAS 38 X 40 INCHES

GARDEN, LATE SUMMER
GERALDINE GIRVAN (Born 1947)
SIGNED
OIL ON CANVAS
38 X 40 INCHES

The influence of her tutors at Edinburgh College of Art, which included Elizabeth Blackadder, can be easily discerned in these colourful, accomplished works. Like many of her Scottish predecessors she is influenced by French artists such as Matisse and Bonnard and as you can see the resulting watercolours and oils introduce us to a vibrant inviting world.

BLUE TABLE AND POPPIES GERALDINE GIRVAN (Born 1947) SIGNED SIGNED AND INSCRIBED WITH TITLE ON REVERSE OIL ON CANVAS 28 1/2 X 25 INCHES

BLUE TABLE AND POPPIES
GERALDINE GIRVAN (Born 1947)
SIGNED
SIGNED AND INSCRIBED WITH TITLE ON REVERSE
OIL ON CANVAS
28 1/2 X 25 INCHES

http://www.chrisbeetles.com

National Portrait Gallery

SARGENT: PORTRAITS OF ARTISTS AND FRIENDS, National Portrait Gallery, London, until 25th May 2015

Robert Louis Stevenson by John Singer Sargent, 1887 Copyright: Courtesy of the Taft Museum of Art, Cincinnati, Ohio

Robert Louis Stevenson by John Singer Sargent, 1887
Copyright: Courtesy of the Taft Museum of Art, Cincinnati, Ohio

This impressive show, which goes on to New York’s Metropolitan Museum in late June, brings together the artist’s wide circle of friends from the theatre, literature, music and the arts whether in New York, Boston, Paris or London nor forgetting his forays into the countryside of Italy and England. Included from these latter expeditions are pictures of fellow artists Jane and Wilfrid de Glehn who accompanied him. You may be interested to know that the de Glehns’ are the subject of an exhibition at Messum’s until 17th April (www.messums.com).

Dame Ethel Smyth by John Singer Sargent, 1901 Copyright: National Portrait Gallery, London

Dame Ethel Smyth by John Singer Sargent, 1901
Copyright: National Portrait Gallery, London

Through these highly engaging portraits and studies we see a more intimate and relaxed approach to his subject matter than found in his commissioned portraits. A factor perhaps best summed up in the words of Richard Ormond CBE, who has curated this exhibition: ‘Sargent’s enthusiasms were all for things new and exciting. He was a fearless advocate of the work of younger artists, and in music his influence on behalf of modern composers and musicians ranged far and wide. The aim of this exhibition is to challenge the conventional view of Sargent. As a painter he is well known; but Sargent the intellectual, the connoisseur of music, the literary polymath, is something new.’

Group with Parasols by John Singer Sargent, c.1904–5 Copyright: Private collection

Group with Parasols by John Singer Sargent, c.1904–5
Copyright: Private collection

npg.org.uk