Contemporary Mexican Sculpture in London

A New Sculpture in London’s Trafalgar Square, until December 2015

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Visitors to Trafalgar Square will no doubt have noticed the new sculpture on King Charles Island (near the top of Whitehall).  Entitled You it is the work of the Mexican sculptor José Rivelino and weighs 25 tons and is 14.5 meters in length. The two pointing fingers represent human equality and when one passes between them it represents the idea of inclusivity.

This is the first of a series of Mexican contemporary sculptures to be revealed in the capital over September and is part of the Dual Year of UK and Mexico 2015.

 

 

mexicouk2015.mx

 

Turps Banana at Edel Assanti

‘TURPS GOES WEST’, Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1, until 1st September 2015

Roisin Fogarty Slow West, 2015 Oil on canvas, 86.5 x 81cm

Roisin Fogarty
Slow West, 2015
Oil on canvas, 86.5 x 81cm

This is an exhibition of the sixteen artists who have recently completed the Turps Studio Programme 2014-21015. The programme takes place in the Turps Studios, which are situated on the Aylesbury Estate in South London, and is artist-led and designed to let artists reflect and focus on their work path.

Jessie Makinson Tasty, 2015 Oil and oil bar on canvas

Jessie Makinson
Tasty, 2015
Oil and oil bar on canvas

The artists featured in this show are: Lesley Blakelock, India Dewar, David Edmond, Roisin Fogarty, Adam Hennessey, Norman Hyams, Benjamin Jamie, Adam Kelly, Dale Lewis, Fiona Long, Jessie Makinson, Mateusz Odrobny, Paige Perkins, Richard Reid Jonathan Stubbs and Nadine Talalla.

Paige Perkins 27 Clouds, 2015 Oil on canvas, 120 x 170cm

Paige Perkins
27 Clouds, 2015
Oil on canvas, 120 x 170cm

Exhibition closed on Monday Bank Holiday (31st August)

http://www.turpsbanana.com

 

http://www.edelassanti.com

Ex-Machina

Paul Thirkell, Ex-Machina, R.K. Burt Gallery, 57-61 Union Street, London, SE1, until 27th August 2015

Primal Scene, Paul Thirkell, archival inkjet print, 2014 © Paul Thirkell

Primal Scene, Paul Thirkell, archival inkjet print, 2014
© Paul Thirkell

Paul Thirkell was one of the forerunners in digital inkjet printmaking processes and was the winner of the R.K. Burt prize in the 2014 National Original Print Competition.  This exhibition celebrates his wide range of print making techniques which are unified in his subject matter which comes from scientific and natural history images, garnered from old journals and encyclopaedias.  The result is a colourful melange of old and new techniques which bring – in the artist’s own words – ‘a dream-like quality that would no longer make sense as scientific illustrations.’

Ex Machina, Paul Thirkell, photo etching, drypoint, collagraph and monoprint, 2015 © Paul Thirkell

Ex Machina, Paul Thirkell, photo etching, drypoint, collagraph and monoprint, 2015
© Paul Thirkell

rkburt.com/gallery-2

Secrets of the Deep, Paul Thirkell, archival inkjet print, 2015 © Paul Thirkell

Secrets of the Deep, Paul Thirkell, archival inkjet print, 2015
© Paul Thirkell

‘Howzats!’

An Ashes Celebration: An Exhibition of Cricket Cartoons, Chris Beetles Gallery, 8 & 10 Ryder Street
St James’s, London SW1
, until Saturday 29 August 2015

SUPERPADS PETER CROSS (Born 1951)

SUPERPADS
PETER CROSS (Born 1951)

A history of cricketing cartoons is a fitting way to mark the English Ashes victory and the final Test Match at the Oval.  It is worth remembering that ten percent of all sales achieved will go to Tim Rice’s cricket charity ‘A Chance to Shine’.

MCC PAINTING COLLECTION DENNIS COMPTON'S CRICKET BOOTS BY VINCENT VAN GOGH LARRY (TERENCE PARKES) (1927-2003)

MCC PAINTING COLLECTION
DENNIS COMPTON’S CRICKET BOOTS BY VINCENT VAN GOGH
LARRY (TERENCE PARKES) (1927-2003)

www.chancetoshine.org

WINSTON AT THE NETS (QUESTION TIME) THE MORE BOWLING HE GETS THE BETTER HE LIKES IT EDWARD TENNYSON REED (1860-1933)

WINSTON AT THE NETS (QUESTION TIME)
THE MORE BOWLING HE GETS THE BETTER HE LIKES IT
EDWARD TENNYSON REED (1860-1933)

 http://www.chrisbeetles.com

PAUL GAUVINIER STRODE IN TO BAT PASSING SID WHO HAD BEEN CAUGHT OUT PAUL COX (Born 1957)

PAUL GAUVINIER STRODE IN TO BAT PASSING SID WHO HAD BEEN CAUGHT OUT
PAUL COX (Born 1957)

Pirandello in London

Fausto Pirandello, Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 39a Canonbury Square, London N1, until 6th September 2015

Composition, 1928 Oil on canvas, 106 x 100 cm Private collection

Composition, 1928
Oil on canvas, 106 x 100 cm
Private collection

While his father the Nobel Prize winning writer Luigi Pirandello is more widely known outside Italy, it does surprise me that his son Fausto Pirandello (1899 – 1975) is not and that this is the first UK exhibition devoted to his work. Some fifty of Fausto Pirandello’s works are included in this show and they clearly explain why he was an important figure in Italian culture from the Thirties into the Fifties.

Gymnasium (Athletes – Athletes in a Gymnasium), c. 1934 Oil on board, 163 x 113 cm Private collection

Gymnasium (Athletes – Athletes in a Gymnasium), c. 1934
Oil on board, 163 x 113 cm
Private collection

http://www.estorickcollection.com

Bathers on the Beach (Large Bathers), c. 1961 Oil on board, 103 x 150 cm Private collection, Rome

Bathers on the Beach (Large Bathers), c. 1961
Oil on board, 103 x 150 cm
Private collection, Rome

A Royal Welcome

 

A Royal Welcome, The Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace, until 27th September 2015.

The Ballroom at Buckingham Palace prepared for a State Banquet Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

The Ballroom at Buckingham Palace prepared for a State Banquet
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

It is hard to imagine the idea, living in a small flat, that as many as sixty-two thousand guests were invited to Buckingham Palace last year. They came to Garden Parties, receptions, Investitures, private audiences and finally and certainly not least State Visits with their full panoply of splendour.

The Australian State Coach, on display at the Grand Entrance. It is used as part of the arrival procession on the first day of a State Visit. Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

The Australian State Coach, on display at the Grand Entrance. It is used as part of the arrival procession on the first day of a State Visit.
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

For the first time this year visitors to the Summer Opening are allowed to enter the Palace through the Grand Entrance. As you do so you will pass the Australian State Coach which was used to bring Prince Philip and Señora Rivera de Peña, wife of the President of the United Mexican States, in the procession which brought the Queen and the Mexican President to the Palace at the commencement of their State Visit in March this year.

Knighting Stool Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

Knighting Stool
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

As you progress through the State Rooms you will come upon displays that reflect the various reasons why guests are invited. In the Throne Room Investitures is the theme with a display of orders, the Knighting Stool and sword as well as paintings of recipients of the Order of Merit.

Salt cellar acquired by George I, c.1721 and placed in front of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh at a State Banquet. It contains two compartments - one for salt, the other mustard. Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

Salt cellar acquired by George I, c.1721 and placed in front of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh at a State Banquet. It contains two compartments – one for salt, the other mustard.
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

The State Banquet in the Ballroom is the highlight of a State Visit and this year visitors see how the table is set-out for a banquet. It is a truly impressive sight with pieces from George IV’s silver-gilt Grand Service adorning the table which has one hundred and seventy place settings. It must be even more spectacular when the Queen and her guests are there.

Historic copper mould used to make ice cream bombes, served at State Banquets Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

Historic copper mould used to make ice cream bombes, served at State Banquets
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

Just before you go into the Ballroom you pass through the Ball Supper Room which has displays showing some of the behind-the-scenes preparations for a State banquet including the kitchens, silver and china pantries and the wine cellars. The recreation of the Dresser’s workroom includes items worn by the Queen and in adjoining displays there are some of her evening gowns worn at Banquets over the years as well as some of her personal diamond jewellery which she wears with them.

Tree of Life - a traditional Mexican clay sculpture, presented to The Queen by the President of the United Mexican States, 2015 Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

Tree of Life – a traditional Mexican clay sculpture, presented to The Queen by the President of the United Mexican States, 2015
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

In the State Dining Room some of the gifts presented to Her Majesty by visiting Heads of State are on show. It is customary for gifts to be exchanged on the first day of a State Visit as a token of goodwill. Garden Parties are celebrated in the display in the Music Room. As you leave the Palace through the Bow Room the doors are open to the 1844 Drawing Room on the right which is set up for a meeting of the Privy Council. It is also the room where new Ambassadors present their credentials to the Queen and where she receives people in audience.

Centrepiece in use during a State Banquet at Buckingham Palace Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

Centrepiece in use during a State Banquet at Buckingham Palace
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

Visitors to the Summer Opening always get a most warm and friendly welcome from all the attendants on duty which helps make it such a special pleasure to visit the Palace. What this year’s theme does is show how very special and wonderful it is to be invited as a guest of Her Majesty the Queen.

The Ballroom at Buckingham Palace set up for a State Banquet. Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

The Ballroom at Buckingham Palace set up for a State Banquet.
Royal Collection Trust (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2015

 

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk

Turner in Salisbury

Turner’s Wessex – Architecture and Ambition, The Salisbury Museum, The King’s House, 65 The Close, Salisbury SP1 2EN, until 27th September 2015

Salisbury from Old Sarum c.1827-1828 Watercolour JMW Turner © The Salisbury Museum

Salisbury from Old Sarum c.1827-1828 Watercolour JMW Turner
© The Salisbury Museum

This hugely enjoyable exhibition serves as a timely reminder that there are some very fine exhibitions to be found outside London. Combine Salisbury and the young J MW Turner and the results are quite magical. As well as works from the Museum’s own collection there are loans from Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, British Museum, Fitzwilliam Museum, National Galleries Scotland, V & A, Whitworth Art Gallery and the Tate.

A series of watercolours, executed between 1797 and 1805, depicting both the Cathedral and City were commissioned by Sir Richard Colt Hoare and the eight large ones of the cathedral which used to hang in the library of Colt Hoare’s family home Stourhead are reunited for the first time since their sale in 1883. There are also some studies of the famous Stourhead gardens too.

North Porch of Salisbury Cathedral, Exhibited RA 1797 Watercolour JMW Turner © The Salisbury Museum

North Porch of Salisbury Cathedral, Exhibited RA 1797 Watercolour JMW Turner
© The Salisbury Museum

Another Wiltshire landowner was William Beckford and his commission for Turner to depict his Fonthill estate was also a feather in Turner’s cap. The sketches he created provide a fascinating glimpse into the erection of the famous Fonthill tower which would collapse in 1825.

Stonehenge c.1827-29 Watercolour JMW Turner © The Salisbury Museum

Stonehenge c.1827-29 Watercolour JMW Turner
© The Salisbury Museum

Turner’s first visit to Salisbury was in 1795 and he would return to the area occasionally over the next thirty years – to Stonehenge as well as to the Isle of Wight and the southern coast – and these visits are recorded in the last section of an exhibition I have no hesitation in recommending.

http://www.salisburymuseum.org.uk