David Kent and Lorenzo Chinnici

The Synergy of Sons – Kent/Chinnici, Menier Gallery, 51 Southwark Street, London SE1, 2nd 7th November, 2015

David Kent Snake and Ladders

David Kent
Snake and Ladders

Following their joint exhibition at The Six Inch Gallery in Milan the show comes to London.  The sons’ 0f British artist David Kent and Italian artist Lorenzo Chinnici are the motivating force behind this international venture and hence the title.

Lorenzo Chinnici Fishermen

Lorenzo Chinnici
Fishermen

Chinnici’s work combines Sicilian traditions with sensitivity and the concept of memory while Kent’s works reflect his interest in Pop Art and the attitudes associated with it. Although both artists suffer from an eye disorder I am delighted to say that they are still painting.

 

http://www.kentgalleries.com

http://www.lorenzochinnici.com

http://www.meniergallery.co.uk

Two at the Northcote Gallery

The Northcote Gallery, 110 Northcote Road, London SW11

 

I thought I would share these two exhibitions with you:

 

 

Tom Homewood – Looking in the Sky, until 10th November 2015

Tom Homewood Cliffs and Low Tide, Sussex oil on panel 40 x 40cm

Tom Homewood
Cliffs and Low Tide, Sussex
oil on panel 40 x 40cm

This artist was originally in the world of advertising before circumstances led him to concentrate on his painting and his family.  One can easily appreciate why his work has been widely shown in London, New York and Europe.

 

 

Jo Barrett – Still Life, 4th – 25th November 2015

Jo Barrett Still Life With Pear and Bowl oil on canvas 80 x 120cm

Jo Barrett
Still Life With Pear and Bowl
oil on canvas 80 x 120cm

The artist brings the traditional genre of the Still-Life into the contemporary world by her skilful use of catching light and form.  They are paintings which focus the viewer’s attention on the serene scene before them.

 

http://www.northcotegallery.com

Ancient Greek Jewellery

AMARANTHINE: Flowers of Hellenic Adornment, Kallos Gallery, 14 – 16 Davies Street, London W1, until 18th December 2015

Pair of Gold Lion-Head Bracelets. Credit Kallos Gallery and Steve Wakeham

Pair of Gold Lion-Head Bracelets.
Credit Kallos Gallery and Steve Wakeham

The word Amaranthine is appropriate for this rather special exhibition as it is derived from Ancient Greek and means beautiful, unfading, words that can be readily applied to these pieces of Greek jewellery which date from the 4th and 3rd Centuries BC.

Hellenistic Necklace and Earrings Credit Kallos Gallery and Steve Wakeham

Hellenistic Necklace and Earrings
Credit Kallos Gallery and Steve Wakeham

The solid gold Lion-head bracelets remind us that Lion emblems were a symbol of rank and status for both men and women.  The Hellenistic gold, garnet and agate necklace and earrings would most likely have been a very clear sign of the wearer’s position and wealth although sometimes such pieces were used as an offering to the gods.  The Herakles Knot that adorns the gold armlet was associated with marriage and may be the original source for the phrase ‘tying the knot’.

Hellenistic Gold Armlet Credit Kallos Gallery and Steve Wakeham

Hellenistic Gold Armlet
Credit Kallos Gallery and Steve Wakeham

The gallery’s director Dr Glenn Lacki sums it up saying “These pieces intrigue the mind as well as they once adorned the body. Jewellery has deep-rooted connections to social ritual – connections that cut across time and cultures. The pieces we are bringing together for Amaranthine are heavy in gold, but carry also their own extraordinary histories that entice our imaginations.”

 

http://www.kallosgallery.com

Kenneth Rowntree

Kenneth Rowntree, The Redfern Gallery, 20 Cork Street, London W1, until 4thNovember 2015

Abstract Landscape Acomb - 1975

Abstract Landscape Acomb – 1975

Following this exhibition’s acclaimed showing at the Fry Art Gallery (Saffron Walden) and Pallant House Gallery (Chichester) it now comes to London as a selling show and includes ten unseen works from the artist’s studio.  The exhibition is the fruit of the labours of Liss Llewellyn Fine Art and Moore-Gwyn Fine Art who have long thought that this important artist deserved more attention and to find his rightful place in Modern British Art.  This, his centenary year, is certainly the right time to do it.

All Content - 1949

All Content – 1949

Kenneth Rowntree (1915–1997) was a multi-faceted artist being involved with the Recording Britain project of the 1940s, the Royal College of Art in the 50s and then from 1959-1980 he was Professor of Fine Art in Newcastle. His work is unique and even though it can be said to either anticipate or be influenced by other artistic figures it is very much his own.

Putney Gardens - 1960s

Putney Gardens – 1960s

http://www.lissfineart.com      http://www.mooregwynfineart.co.uk

redfern-gallery.com

Night and Day 1 - 1988

Night and Day 1 – 1988

‘FALLEN’

Harry & Ben Tucker ‘FALLEN’, Mead Carney Fine Art, 45 Dover Street, London W1, until 14th November 2015

Bomb Drinks Cabinet

Bomb Drinks Cabinet

Harry and Ben Tucker use their imagination in creating in creating interior design pieces and furniture from abandoned, decommissioned aircraft with verve and vigour.

747 Wheel Table with Tyre

747 Wheel Table with Tyre

Fuselages, doors, wing parts, wheels, engine parts and fuel tanks can be transformed into pieces that recall Art Deco and Parisian furniture of the 40s but which remain very much in the 21st century.  A great way to add glamour and style to your home.

Exhaust Lamp

Exhaust Lamp

 

http://www.meadcarney.com

Fuselage Clock (Red)

Fuselage Clock (Red)

Eileen Gray

Eileen Gray: The Private Painter, Osborne Samuel, 23A Bruton St, London W1, until 7th November 2015

 Eileen Gray, Still Life with Kpan Mask, 1920s Vintage silver gelatin print 11.2 × 11.3 cm (43 /8 × 41 /2 in)

Eileen Gray,
Still Life with Kpan Mask, 1920s
Vintage silver gelatin print 11.2 × 11.3 cm (43 /8 × 41 /2 in)

It is a surprise that this is the first UK exhibition of paintings by the notable Irish designer and architect Eileen Gray (1878 – 1976) and thankfully the publication of an eponymous book allows us to experience this great treat.  Although she was first an exponent of Art Deco by the mid-1920s she was one of the leading pioneering figures of Modernism.  Painting was a pastime to relax from the stresses of everyday life, although some served as inspirations for her carpets. As well as her pictures there are some of her letters and other ephemera as well as objects from her studio.

 Eileen Gray L’Art Noir (Study for Rug), 1920s, Gouache on paper, 27.2 × 27.2 cm (105/8 in × 105/8 in)

Eileen Gray
L’Art Noir (Study for Rug), 1920s,
Gouache on paper, 27.2 × 27.2 cm (105/8 in × 105/8 in)

One can easily appreciate why Yves St Laurent’s interest in her works in the early 1970s deservedly revived interest in her work.

Table with blue glass vase, beach pebble on stand, African sculpture on lacquered base, Greek torso on marble base, two ceramic bowls and one small wooden easel

Table with blue glass vase, beach pebble on stand, African sculpture on lacquered base, Greek torso on marble base, two ceramic bowls and one small wooden easel

Book Details: Eileen Gray: The Private Painter by Peter Adam and Andrew Lambirth Published by Lund Humphries and Osborne Samuel gallery. UK Publication October 2015, US Publication November 2015 60 colour and 10 b&w illustrations; 104pp, 265 x 228mm. Hardback: 978-1-84822-183-3 R.R.P. £30.00 / $60.

Eileen Gray, Untitled, 1920, Gouache, pencil & collage on paper, 17.3 x 17 cms (63⁄4 x 63⁄4 in)

Eileen Gray,
Untitled, 1920,
Gouache, pencil & collage on paper, 17.3 x 17 cms (63⁄4 x 63⁄4 in)

http://www.osbornesamuel.com

INDIA: COLOUR and LIGHT

Pigment, Form and Light: The Arts of India 1550-1900,  Prahlad Bubbar, 33 Cork Street, London, W1, until 14thNovember 2015

A Vision of an Elephant Hunt Attributed to the artist Mir Kalan Khan Lucknow, India, circa 1760 Opaque watercolour and gold on paper 21.5 x 13.2 cm

A Vision of an Elephant Hunt
Attributed to the artist Mir Kalan Khan
Lucknow, India, circa 1760
Opaque watercolour and gold on paper
21.5 x 13.2 cm

This show is an elegant celebration of Indian court life, revealed through classical paintings, objects and early photographs.

Bell-shaped Huqqa Base with Poppy design Bidri alloy inlaid with silver Bidar, Deccan, India Circa 1750-1780 Height: 16.5 cm Diameter: 16 cm

Bell-shaped Huqqa Base with Poppy design
Bidri alloy inlaid with silver
Bidar, Deccan, India
Circa 1750-1780
Height: 16.5 cm Diameter: 16 cm

The 18th century Indo-Islamic courts of Hyderabad and Lucknow as well as early 19th century Mughal Delhi are revealed through works commissioned by resident Europeans.  They reflect the spirit of tolerance, curiosity and romance of the time. While colour is a part of Indian life it is its light that unifies paintings, photographs and objects.

http://www.prahladbubbar.com 

 

The Fabric of India, V&A Museum, London SW7, until 10thJanuary 2016

Installation view of The Fabric of India at the VA_ (c) Victoria and Albert Museum

Installation view of The Fabric of India at the VA_
(c) Victoria and Albert Museum

This is an extensive exhibition which is a must for all interested in textiles, costume and Indian culture. You will discover bandanna handkerchiefs, the tent of Tipu Sultan (1750-1799), saris, temple hangings, floor spreads as well as the chintzes and hangings sought by Western consumers either to wear or adorn beds and rooms in Europe.

Hanging Wall hanging of embroidered cotton with silks, for the Western Market Gujarat, ca. 1700. (c) Victoria and Albert Museum

Hanging
Wall hanging of embroidered cotton with silks, for the Western Market
Gujarat, ca. 1700.
(c) Victoria and Albert Museum

It is also a history of the production of these glorious textiles, with many processes explained and highlighted.  The influence and threat to Indian hand-made textiles by the industrial processes of European textile making is examined as is the resistance movement to such processes which led to a resurgence of pride and opposition to them by supporting indigenous production.  A stand which is possibly best exemplified in the 1930s by Mahatma Gandhi asking the Indian people to spin and weave their own cloth, Khadi.  Khadi as many of you will know, became a tool of the Independence Movement. Nor is the importance of contemporary Indian textiles ignored with fine examples highlighting its importance both at home and internationally.

Houndstooth sari by Abraham & Thakore, double ikat silk, Hyderabad Artist: Date: 2011 Credit line: Photograph courtesy of Abraham & Thakore

Houndstooth sari by Abraham & Thakore, double ikat silk, Hyderabad
Artist:
Date: 2011
Credit line: Photograph courtesy of Abraham & Thakore

http://www.vam.ac.uk