INDIA: COLOUR and LIGHT

Pigment, Form and Light: The Arts of India 1550-1900,  Prahlad Bubbar, 33 Cork Street, London, W1, until 14thNovember 2015

A Vision of an Elephant Hunt Attributed to the artist Mir Kalan Khan Lucknow, India, circa 1760 Opaque watercolour and gold on paper 21.5 x 13.2 cm

A Vision of an Elephant Hunt
Attributed to the artist Mir Kalan Khan
Lucknow, India, circa 1760
Opaque watercolour and gold on paper
21.5 x 13.2 cm

This show is an elegant celebration of Indian court life, revealed through classical paintings, objects and early photographs.

Bell-shaped Huqqa Base with Poppy design Bidri alloy inlaid with silver Bidar, Deccan, India Circa 1750-1780 Height: 16.5 cm Diameter: 16 cm

Bell-shaped Huqqa Base with Poppy design
Bidri alloy inlaid with silver
Bidar, Deccan, India
Circa 1750-1780
Height: 16.5 cm Diameter: 16 cm

The 18th century Indo-Islamic courts of Hyderabad and Lucknow as well as early 19th century Mughal Delhi are revealed through works commissioned by resident Europeans.  They reflect the spirit of tolerance, curiosity and romance of the time. While colour is a part of Indian life it is its light that unifies paintings, photographs and objects.

http://www.prahladbubbar.com 

 

The Fabric of India, V&A Museum, London SW7, until 10thJanuary 2016

Installation view of The Fabric of India at the VA_ (c) Victoria and Albert Museum

Installation view of The Fabric of India at the VA_
(c) Victoria and Albert Museum

This is an extensive exhibition which is a must for all interested in textiles, costume and Indian culture. You will discover bandanna handkerchiefs, the tent of Tipu Sultan (1750-1799), saris, temple hangings, floor spreads as well as the chintzes and hangings sought by Western consumers either to wear or adorn beds and rooms in Europe.

Hanging Wall hanging of embroidered cotton with silks, for the Western Market Gujarat, ca. 1700. (c) Victoria and Albert Museum

Hanging
Wall hanging of embroidered cotton with silks, for the Western Market
Gujarat, ca. 1700.
(c) Victoria and Albert Museum

It is also a history of the production of these glorious textiles, with many processes explained and highlighted.  The influence and threat to Indian hand-made textiles by the industrial processes of European textile making is examined as is the resistance movement to such processes which led to a resurgence of pride and opposition to them by supporting indigenous production.  A stand which is possibly best exemplified in the 1930s by Mahatma Gandhi asking the Indian people to spin and weave their own cloth, Khadi.  Khadi as many of you will know, became a tool of the Independence Movement. Nor is the importance of contemporary Indian textiles ignored with fine examples highlighting its importance both at home and internationally.

Houndstooth sari by Abraham & Thakore, double ikat silk, Hyderabad Artist: Date: 2011 Credit line: Photograph courtesy of Abraham & Thakore

Houndstooth sari by Abraham & Thakore, double ikat silk, Hyderabad
Artist:
Date: 2011
Credit line: Photograph courtesy of Abraham & Thakore

http://www.vam.ac.uk

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