From Freud to Van Dyck

Painters’ Paintings – From Feud to Van Dyck, Sainsbury Wing, National Gallery, London,  until 4th September 2016

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot Italian Woman, or Woman with Yellow Sleeve (L'Italienne) about 1870 Oil on canvas 73 x 59 cm © The National Gallery, London

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
Italian Woman, or Woman with Yellow Sleeve (L’Italienne)
about 1870
Oil on canvas
73 x 59 cm
© The National Gallery, London

It really should not come as a surprise that painters may actually collect paintings to both live with and be inspired by whether they are contemporary or not.  The lynch-pin painting in this show is the strong depiction of an Italian Woman by Corot which belonged to the late, great Lucian Freud and which he left to the Nation on his death in 2011.  One can certainly understand why this powerful work would have appealed to Freud.

This exciting and informative exhibition also looks at works that were owned by Matisse, Degas, Frederic, Lord Leighton, Watts, Sir Thomas Lawrence, Sir Joshua Reynolds and Sir Anthony van Dyck and they in many ways expand our knowledge of the owners.

Titian The Vendramin Family, venerating a Relic of the True Cross Begun about 1540-3, completed about 1550-60 Oil on canvas 206.1 x 288.5 cm © The National Gallery, London

Titian
The Vendramin Family, venerating a Relic of the True Cross
Begun about 1540-3, completed about 1550-60
Oil on canvas
206.1 x 288.5 cm
© The National Gallery, London

 

George Frederic Watts Self Portrait in a Red Robe, about 1853 Oil on canvas 154.9 × 74.9 cm Frame: 179 × 100.5 × 9.5 cm © Watts Gallery (COMWG2014.10)

George Frederic Watts
Self Portrait in a Red Robe, about 1853
Oil on canvas
154.9 × 74.9 cm
Frame: 179 × 100.5 × 9.5 cm
© Watts Gallery (COMWG2014.10)

 

 

Jacopo Tinteretto Jupiter and Semele about 1545 Oil on spruce 22.7 x 65.4 cm © The National Gallery, London

Jacopo Tinteretto
Jupiter and Semele
about 1545
Oil on spruce
22.7 x 65.4 cm
© The National Gallery, London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The more than eighty works on show combine examples of the artists’ own work with the ones they acquired whether purchased by the artists themselves, received as gifts or bought as investments or status symbols. This is perhaps best summed up by Sir Joshua Reynolds who said“Works of art are models you are to imitate, and at the same time rivals you are to combat”

This is an enlightening show of the painter as collector and one that really has to be seen for its message to be fully appreciated.

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres Angelica saved by Ruggiero 1819-39 Oil on canvas 47.6 x 39.4 cm © The National Gallery, London

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Angelica saved by Ruggiero
1819-39
Oil on canvas
47.6 x 39.4 cm
© The National Gallery, London

 

Raphael An Allegory (‘Vision of a Knight’) about 1504 Oil on poplar 17.1 x 17.3 cm © The National Gallery, London

Raphael
An Allegory (‘Vision of a Knight’)
about 1504
Oil on poplar
17.1 x 17.3 cm
© The National Gallery, London

 

Paul Gauguin Young Man with a Flower behind his Ear, 1891 Oil on canvas 45.7 × 33.3 cm Property from a distinguished Private Collection, courtesy of Christie's Photo © Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images

Paul Gauguin
Young Man with a Flower behind his Ear, 1891
Oil on canvas
45.7 × 33.3 cm
Property from a distinguished Private Collection, courtesy of Christie’s
Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk

Rembrandt Lamentation over the Dead Christ, about 1634-1635 Pen and brown ink and brown wash, with red and perhaps some black chalk, reworked in oils ‘en grisaille’; framing lines in thin black oil paint; on paper 21.6 × 25.4 cm © The British Museum, London (Oo,9.103)

Rembrandt
Lamentation over the Dead Christ, about 1634-1635
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, with red and perhaps some black chalk, reworked in oils ‘en grisaille’; framing lines in thin black oil paint; on paper
21.6 × 25.4 cm
© The British Museum, London (Oo,9.103)

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