Paul Nash

Paul Nash, Tate Britain, until 5th March 2017

Paul Nash 1889–1946 Equivalents for the Megaliths 1935 Oil on canvas support: 457 x 660 mm frame: 627 x 835 x 80 mm ©Tate

Paul Nash 1889–1946
Equivalents for the Megaliths
1935
Oil on canvas
support: 457 x 660 mm frame: 627 x 835 x 80 mm
©Tate

This is an extensive exhibition looking at the artistic journey of this important 20th century British artist from his early works right up until his final landscapes.  An important War Artist during the First World War he returned afterwards to depicting the coastal areas and landscapes of southern England reflecting his interest in Britain’s ancient places.

Paul Nash 1889–1946 Spring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917 1918 Imperial War Museum, London ©Tate

Paul Nash 1889–1946
Spring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917
1918
Imperial War Museum, London
©Tate

In the 1930s Nash used surrealist ideas in achieving these landscape images juxtaposing found objects with a landscape to produce an air of mystery and a dream-like quality. He also used photography in his work-practice and worked with Eileen Agar.

Paul Nash 1889-1946 Landscape from a Dream 1936-8 ©Tate

Paul Nash 1889-1946
Landscape from a Dream
1936-8
©Tate

Nash was one of the founders of the Unit One group of British modernist artists which included John Armstrong, Barbara Hepworth, Tristram Hillier, Ben Nicholson, Henry Moore and Edward Wadsworth among their numbers and his contribution is explored alongside examples of other works from the group.

www.tate.org.uk

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