Ceramicists Celebrated!

Ken Price: A Survey of Sculptures and Drawings, 1959 – 2006, Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1, until 4th February 2017

Installation view, 'Ken Price. A Study of Sculptures and Drawings, 1959 – 2006', Hauser & Wirth London Photo: Alex Delfanne

Installation view, ‘Ken Price. A Study of Sculptures and Drawings, 1959 – 2006’, Hauser & Wirth London
Photo: Alex Delfanne

Spread over both gallery spaces this exhibition provides an extensive survey of Ken Price’s ceramic output.  Through drawings and sculptures we see how this innovative artist changed the way in which ceramics were regarded by transferring the concept of them being practical pieces into the idea of their being artworks in their own right.  Drawing on many influences and inspirations he achieved this spectacularly.

Installation view, 'Ken Price. A Study of Sculptures and Drawings, 1959 – 2006', Hauser & Wirth London Photo: Alex Delfanne

Installation view, ‘Ken Price. A Study of Sculptures and Drawings, 1959 – 2006’, Hauser & Wirth London
Photo: Alex Delfanne

http://www.hauserwirth.com/

Shaping Ceramics: From Lucie Rie to Edmund de WaalJewish Museum London, Raymond Burton House, 129 – 131 Albert Street, London NW1, until 26th February 2017

Antonia Salmon, Wind Rush, 2016 Height 32cm, Courtesy of Antonia Salmon

Antonia Salmon, Wind Rush, 2016 Height 32cm, Courtesy of Antonia Salmon

This is a marvellous opportunity to see the work of gifted potters and the exhibition starts with the Jewish émigrés who brought the ideas and styles of central Europe to a Britain where ceramicists were following the Anglo-Oriental fusion practiced by Bernard Leach. Lucy Rie, Hans Coper and Ruth Duckworth were promoted by Henry Rothschild, a refugee himself, through his London-based store Primavera.

Lucie Rie, Buttons, Courtesy of The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent

Lucie Rie, Buttons, Courtesy of The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent

From more recent times one sees the work of the celebrated Edmund de Waal and other of his generation, including those who express their Jewish identity through their work. It is a great celebration of ceramic art – I was particularly pleased to see a selection of the buttons created by Lucy Rie as I had first heard about them from Paul Atterbury many years ago.

Ray Silverman, Thrown Stoneware Form, around 1983 Photo Tal Silverman

Ray Silverman, Thrown Stoneware Form, around 1983 Photo Tal Silverman

I shall leave the final words to the Museum’s director Abigail Morris who has said ““This exhibition offers a new perspective on ceramics as well as an opportunity to see some beautiful artwork. It is the first time these ceramicists have been grouped and exhibited together in this way and we hope that our visitors will enjoy discovering how Jewish ceramicists changed the face of British studio pottery”

Edmund de Waal, Arcady, P489, 2007. Photo Heini Schneebeli, courtesy of the Crafts Council

Edmund de Waal, Arcady, P489, 2007. Photo Heini Schneebeli, courtesy of the Crafts Council

jewishmuseum.org.uk

2 comments on “Ceramicists Celebrated!

  1. john.kirkwood48@yahoo.co.uk says:

    It looks good !

  2. I covet the Lucie Rie buttons

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s