Masterpiece London 2017 – E & H Manners

E & H Manners at Masterpiece 2017, until 5th July 2017

 

A Netherlandish Maiolica Jug, Utrecht
Dated 1558
Height to pewter thumbpiece: 21.8 cm
Height to top of rim: 19.0cm

This family-run Kensington Church Street firm will be well known to many collectors from the International Ceramic Fair and subsequently Art Antiques London. I am delighted to be able to tell you that they are now making their first appearance at Masterpiece.

A Large Meissen Octagonal Charger from the Christie-Miller Service
1740-44
34cm wide; 36 from point to point
Crossed swords mark with two dots in the pommels in under-glazed blue and Impressed numeral 22

They have built up a strong reputation for finding European ceramics of great rarity and quality and justifiably many of these pieces now adorn important public and private collections around the world.

A West Country Harvest Jug
Barnstaple or Fremington, Somerset
Dated 1771
32.3 cm. high
26.6 cm. wide

www.europeanporcelain.com

www.masterpiecefair.com

Moments of Pleasure

Juno Antiques – Moments of Pleasure, E & H Manners, 66C Kensington Church Street, W8, 27th June – 1st July 2017

Bristol or Liverpool tin-glazed charger, painted in a Ming Transitional style with a stag and surrounding figures, c.1750-60

Kensington – The Heart of Ceramics features four specialist dealers showing ceramics in Kensington Church Street

One of those taking part is Juno Antiques (Haydn Hansell, Paul McKay and Miles Thompson) who specialise in both 18th century British ceramics and pottery. This year their rather special exhibition celebrates their tenth anniversary. They also stock a good selection of 18th century European pieces as well as glass and enamels. They are certainly to be congratulated on this milestone. 

Rare large pair of hexagonal reticulated Chinese vases and covers, decorated in the London studio of James Giles, c.1750-60

http://www.junoantiques.com/

http://theheartofceramics.com/

Rare Meissen moulded sugar box and cover, painted with chinoiserie scenes reserved on a a ground of blue scales, c.1740

White Ceramics Win!

An Exhibition and Sale: Inspired by Blanc de Chine – The Anthony Collection of White Porcelain, Stockspring Antiques, 114 Kensington Church St, London W8, 7th – 14th June 2017

Mennecy pot-pourri and cover, c. 1750-55

There is something alluring about white porcelain where the only decoration is moulded or applied giving the pieces a sculptural quality and one can quite understand why collectors such as Thelma Chrysler Foy and Mrs Charles Allen Jnr were drawn to it.

St Cloud cups and saucers, left c. 1720-40; right c. 1730-50

Now this exciting collection of more than one hundred and ten pieces of porcelain – Chinese, French, Italian, English and Meissen – dating from c1640 – c1795 gives collectors a great chance to acquire fine examples of this genre.

Meissen coffee pot and cover, c. 1725-30

Garnered over a period of around twenty years the Anthony Collection reveals the influence of Chinese blanc de Chine on European porcelain factories and how these factories then created shapes that were European in origin. It is a fascinating visual feast.

Bow sucriers, c. 1752-54

http://www.antique-porcelain.co.uk

Fit for an 18th century dining table!

Four Private Collections – including a collection of ceramic handled cutlery, Stockspring Antiques, 114 Kensington Church St, London W8, 27th March – 4th April 2017

A boxed set of Worcester knives and forks c. 1758-60, in a ray skin covered standing box lined with crimson silk velvet and silver braid with twelve pairs of knives and forks, English steel blades of scimitar shape and three pronged forks with silver ferrules.

This exhibition comprises ceramics from four different private collections and includes Japanese and Worcester porcelains and a group of cane handles.  Of special note is the collection of more than seventy pieces of ceramic handled cutlery.  The majority of these are French and English but there are some interesting examples of Chinese and Continental porcelain too. They provide an exciting and fascinating guide to not only the changes in ceramic handle shapes but also the development and dating of the silver and steel fittings during the course of the 18th century.

A Bow knife and fork, painted in polychrome with the crest of Moses (Luis) Mendes, c. 1756, a merchant in the City of London.

www.antique-porcelain.co.uk 

AT HOME: ‘Flaming June’

‘Flaming June: The Making of an Icon’, Leighton House Museum, 12 Holland Park Rd, London, W14, until 2nd April 2017

Flaming June: The Making of an Icon, installation shot at Leighton House Museum. Photo: Kevin Moran. Courtesy: Leighton House Museum

Flaming June: The Making of an Icon, installation shot at Leighton House Museum.
Photo: Kevin Moran. Courtesy: Leighton House Museum

What an exciting exhibition this is! Leighton’s iconic painting Flaming June has come back to the house where it was painted and not only that it is reunited with the other works that Leighton included in what was to be his last showing of work at the Royal Academy’s Summer Exhibition because he died in January 1896.

The original installation in Frederic Leighton's Studio, by Bedford Lemere, 1 April 1895. ©Historic England Archive. Image Courtesy of Leighton House Museum

The original installation in Frederic Leighton’s Studio, by Bedford Lemere, 1 April 1895.
©Historic England Archive. Image Courtesy of Leighton House Museum

If that were not enough on its own we are even more spoilt because it is being shown alongside other works (thanks to loans from private collections and the Metropolitan Museum of Art) that he showed at that year’s Summer Exhibition.

Frederic, Lord Leighton (1830-96), was one of the leading artists of his day and between 1878 and his death was President of the Royal Academy. Although not particularly well received at the exhibition Flaming June has become justly famous – its history is fascinating as this exhibition reveals – and is on loan from the Ponce Museum of Art in Puerto Rico.

Flaming June: The Making of an Icon, installation shot at Leighton House Museum. Photo: Kevin Moran. Courtesy: Leighton House Museum

Flaming June: The Making of an Icon, installation shot at Leighton House Museum.
Photo: Kevin Moran. Courtesy: Leighton House Museum

Thanks to the April 1895 photograph showing Flaming June and it’s fellow works before they were submitted to the Royal Academy it has been possible to give now an idea of what visitors on a studio open day would have seen.

Leighton House’s senior curator, Daniel Robbins, sums it up saying: “I am delighted that over 125 years on we can reunite these five paintings created by Leighton in the home and studio he cherished. This exhibition will be a chance for visitors to look more closely into this final body of work with Flaming June as its centrepiece and consider afresh Leighton’s achievements as an artist. I am extremely grateful to those who have loaned the works to us for the exhibition and to those who helped us track down the paintings held in private collections.”

Flaming June: The Making of an Icon, installation shot at Leighton House Museum. Photo: Kevin Moran. Courtesy: Leighton House Museum

Flaming June: The Making of an Icon, installation shot at Leighton House Museum.
Photo: Kevin Moran. Courtesy: Leighton House Museum

 

Open daily except Tuesdays, 10am – 5.30pm but check for opening times over the holiday period.

http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/FlamingJune

London celebrates Asian Art

Panoramic view of the landscape and poem on a brushpot China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng (1723–35) or early Qianlong (1736–95) period, commissioned by Tang Ying (1682–1756) Porcelain with famille-rose (fencai) decoration, height 13.5 cm Private collection

Panoramic view of the landscape and poem on a brushpot
China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng (1723–35)
or early Qianlong (1736–95) period, commissioned by Tang Ying (1682–1756)
Porcelain with famille-rose (fencai) decoration, height 13.5 cm
Private collection

The 19th Asian Art in London runs from 3rd-12th of November and promises once again to bring a wide mixture of art and antiques from all periods. I would especially like to draw your attention to the special exhibition that the Oriental Ceramics Society is holding at Sotheby’s in Bond Street. Entitled ‘China without Dragons’ (3rd-9thNovember 2016) it features some two hundred ceramic pieces with the majority coming from either Japan or China.

Moonflask with carnations and asters China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Ming dynasty, Yongle period (1403–1424) Porcelain with underglaze cobalt-blue decoration, height 28 cm Private collection

Moonflask with carnations and asters
China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Ming dynasty, Yongle period (1403–1424)
Porcelain with underglaze cobalt-blue decoration, height 28 cm
Private collection

As the curator Regina Krahl (a former Society president) says: “This exhibition aims to celebrate the rich store of Chinese ceramics collected within the Oriental Ceramic Society. The fascination of an exhibition such as this lies in its phenomenal spectrum. It covers the full range from the rarest masterpieces that we might see in a major museum show to minor items that would otherwise rarely be exhibited but which display some unusual or noteworthy aspect, are particularly well made, or are simply beautiful. It is hoped that this selection will be enjoyed by specialists as well as by amateurs.”

Zodiac figure of the horse China, Henan province, Gongxian region, Tang dynasty, 7th or 8th century Earthenware with sancai glazes, height 22.2 cm Private collection

Zodiac figure of the horse
China, Henan province, Gongxian region, Tang dynasty, 7th or 8th century
Earthenware with sancai glazes, height 22.2 cm
Private collection

The Oriental Ceramics Society (OCS) was founded in Craven Hill Gardens in London in 1921 and has a long-established reputation as being the leading international society for those interested in studying and appreciating Asian Art and has over seven hundred members worldwide.

Porcelain vase decorated with yangcai overglaze enamels China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Qianlong mark and period (1736-1795) Height 47 cm Private collection

Porcelain vase decorated with yangcai overglaze enamels
China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Qianlong mark and period (1736-1795)
Height 47 cm
Private collection

 

Archaic Jade Notched Disc Late Neolithic period – Shang period, 2000 - 1500 BC Diameter: 33.0cm Courtesy of Eskenazi

Archaic Jade Notched Disc
Late Neolithic period – Shang period, 2000 – 1500 BC
Diameter: 33.0cm
Courtesy of Eskenazi

One cannot write about Asian Art in London without mentioning the renowned firm Eskenazi and what a corker of an exhibition (Early Chinese Art from Private Collections, 3rd – 25th November 2016) they offer us this year.  It consists of twenty-four early examples of Chinese art (early jades, bone carvings, archaic bronzes and inlaid metalwork) dating from the Neolithic period to the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).  They all come from private collections and many have illustrious provenances having been previously owned by well-known collectors, including Luo Zhenyu, Pan Zuyin, Alexandre J. Argyropoulos, Edward T. Chow and Adolphe Stoclet.  Many of the items have a common theme in that they feature animal decoration or animal motifs. Alongside this they are showing works by the well-known contemporary Chinese ink painter Zeng Xiaojun (b.1954) in what is his first European show.

Archaic Bronze Wine Vessel and Cover (You) Shang or Early Western Zhou period, 11th century BC Height (to top of knop): 27.4cm Weight (without handle): 3.80kg Courtesy of Eskenazi

Archaic Bronze Wine Vessel and Cover (You)
Shang or Early Western Zhou period, 11th century BC
Height (to top of knop): 27.4cm
Weight (without handle): 3.80kg
Courtesy of Eskenazi

 

Gilt-bronze, Agate and Turquoise Bear Han period, 206 BC - 220 AD Height: 10.6cm Courtesy of Eskenazi

Gilt-bronze, Agate and Turquoise Bear
Han period, 206 BC – 220 AD
Height: 10.6cm
Courtesy of Eskenazi

 

Bonsai I Ink and colour on paper Dimensions: 180cm by 138cm Signed: Zeng Xiaojun Artist’s seal: Painted by Zeng Xiaojun Courtesy of Eskenazi

Bonsai I
Ink and colour on paper
Dimensions: 180cm by 138cm
Signed: Zeng Xiaojun
Artist’s seal: Painted by Zeng Xiaojun
Courtesy of Eskenazi

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ocs-london.com

http://www.sothebys.com

http://www.eskenazi.co.uk

Lucy B. Campbell at the Winter Olympia Fair 2016

Winter Art & Antiques Fair, Olympia London, Hammersmith Road, London W14, 31st October – 6th November 2016

Marco Ramasso WINTER FIELDS, 2016 Oil on Canvas 47¼ x 47¼ ins /120 x 120 cm

Marco Ramasso
WINTER FIELDS, 2016
Oil on Canvas
47¼ x 47¼ ins /120 x 120 cm

It’s that time of year again and the Fair offers a wide-ranging selection of art and antiques for all tastes.  It is especially useful for those who seek ‘prestige’ items for their homes. One gallery always worth a close look is Lucy B. Campbell.

Juan Luque LAS CENIZAS DEL VIENTO TORRE, 2015 Oil on Canvas on Board 45 x 63 ins / 114 x 160 cm

Juan Luque
LAS CENIZAS DEL VIENTO TORRE, 2015
Oil on Canvas on Board
45 x 63 ins / 114 x 160 cm

After starting her gallery concentrating on rare antiquarian prints in 1984 she gradually moved in the 1990s towards international and British contemporary artists and very successfully specialises in paintings, sculpture and photographs. From her ‘stable’ of British, American and European artists she is bringing a fine selection of works by Anna Pugh, Guillermo Muñoz Vera, Manuel López Herrera, Juan Luque, Carlos Morago and Marco Ramasso to this edition of the Fair.  By the way if you are looking for an artistic Christmas gift then you may find their Anna Pugh Jigsaw Puzzles fit the bill.

Anna Pugh FLYING KITES, 2016 Acrylic on Board 28¾ x 32¾ ins / 73 x 83.2 cm

Anna Pugh
FLYING KITES, 2016
Acrylic on Board
28¾ x 32¾ ins / 73 x 83.2 cm

www.lucybcampbell.co.uk

 

http://www.olympia-antiques.com