HERMAN SELLESLAGS

HERMAN SELLESLAGS: THE ARCHIVES, 88-Gallery, 86-88 Pimlico Road, London SW1, until 24th October 2015

Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin,1970 © Herman Selleslags courtesy of 88-Gallery

Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin,1970
© Herman Selleslags courtesy of 88-Gallery

There is still a chance to go and see this fascinating exhibition of photographs from the 60s and 70s by Flemish street photographer Herman Selleslags.

His subjects were often leading stars of music, sport and screen, including The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bob Marley, Tippi Hedren and of course Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg.

 

http://www.88-gallery.com

Gallery DIFFERENT

ARTPOP – Keith Haynes, Gallery DIFFERENT, 14 Percy Street, Fitzrovia, LondonW1, until 30th May 2015

ALL YOU NEED

ALL YOU NEED

Keith Haynes first splashed into the art scene in 2011 after working with the BBC for three decades. He had studied graphic design while at art school as he wanted to design album covers similar to those of his teenage years. Now he creates striking, appealing artworks using original vinyl records whether portraits, maps, lyrics or abstract shapes.

HITSVILLE UK 3

HITSVILLE UK 3

http://www.gallerydifferent.co.uk

DYLAN

DYLAN

A Portrait of Robert Fraser

A Strong Sweet Smell of Incense – A Portrait of Robert Fraser, Curated by Brian Clarke, Pace London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London, W1, until 28th March 2015

A general view, including Richard Hamilton's Swingeing London 67 (a), 1968-69 and Peter Blake's The Beatles, 1962, 1963-1968. © R. Hamilton. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015 © Peter Blake. All rights reserved, DACS 2015.

A general view, including Richard Hamilton’s Swingeing London 67 (a), 1968-69 and Peter Blake’s The Beatles, 1962, 1963-1968.
© R. Hamilton. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015
© Peter Blake. All rights reserved, DACS 2015.

This is a very special and personal exhibition concentrating on the noted art dealer Robert Fraser whose gallery in the 1960s and the 80s was the pre-eminent gallery in London. He was an advocate of Neo-Expressionism, Pop Art and Op Art and first opened the Robert Fraser Gallery in 1962 with a show of works by Jean Dubuffet. Over the years he exhibited many other artists including Jim Dine, Claes Oldenburg and Brian Clarke who is the curator of this present exhibition.

Jean Dubuffet Cherche-Aubaine (after maquette dated 30 July-December 1973), 1973-2014 polyurethane paint on epoxy resin 399 cm x 211 cm x 117 cm (157-1/16" x 83-1/16" x 46-1/16") work,  27 cm x 269 cm x 200 cm (10-5/8" x 105-7/8" x 78-3/4") plinth © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Jean Dubuffet
Cherche-Aubaine (after maquette dated 30 July-December 1973), 1973-2014 polyurethane paint on epoxy resin
399 cm x 211 cm x 117 cm (157-1/16″ x 83-1/16″ x 46-1/16″) work,
27 cm x 269 cm x 200 cm (10-5/8″ x 105-7/8″ x 78-3/4″) plinth
© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Fraser was not just a gallery owner but a power force and despite living in India for much of the 1970s on his return the gallery was once again a centre not only for art but also for music and culture. Fraser introduced the Beatles to Peter Blake and subsequently was involved in the Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover.

An installation view, including Robert Mapplethorpe, Self Portrait, 1980; Jamie Reid, Large scale screen-printed promotional poster for Sex Pistols' "Never Mind the Bollocks" album, 1977 and Jim Dine's Five Palettes, 1963. © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015 © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used by permission.

An installation view, including Robert Mapplethorpe, Self Portrait, 1980; Jamie Reid, Large scale screen-printed promotional poster for Sex Pistols’ “Never Mind the Bollocks” album, 1977 and Jim Dine’s Five Palettes, 1963.
© ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used by permission.

Fraser is depicted in a portrait by Basquiat and in Richard Hamilton’s Swingeing London 67 screenprint that reproduces the famous image of Fraser and Mick Jagger handcuffed together in a police van, and in various documentary photographs and his office has also been recreated.

Recreation of Robert Fraser's office, including Jann Haworth's  Cowboy, 1964 and Claes Oldenburg's London Knees (1966) © Jann Haworth © Claes Oldenburg

Recreation of Robert Fraser’s office, including Jann Haworth’s Cowboy, 1964 and Claes Oldenburg’s London Knees (1966)
© Jann Haworth
© Claes Oldenburg

This is in some ways a bitter-sweet exhibition because it recalls times gone by but it is definitely one that should not be missed.

Installation View, including Francis Bacon's Portrait of John Edwards, 1988 and  Jean-Michel Basquiat's ROB'T FRAZER, 1984 © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015. © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS 2015.

Installation View, including Francis Bacon’s Portrait of John Edwards, 1988 and Jean-Michel Basquiat’s ROB’T FRAZER, 1984
© The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015.
© The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS 2015.

http://www.pacegallery.com/london

The Beatles – Abbey Road

The Photographs & Photobooks Sale, Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions
Bloomsbury House, 24 Maddox Street, London W1,
Friday 21st November 2014.

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I do wonder whether the Scottish photographer Iain Macmillan (1938-2006) thought that the final cover shot for The Beatles’ Abbey Road album would become so enduringly popular. The zebra crossing used in the shots has become a major attraction for Beatles fans from around the world, so much so that it is now Grade II listed.

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He actually said of it in 1989 “That photo’s been called an icon of the 60s. I suppose it is. I think the reason it became so popular is its simplicity. It’s a very simple, stylised shot. Also it’s a shot people can relate to. It’s a place where people can still walk.”

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I can assure you, living not far away, that they do and taking a photo on the crossing is almost de rigueur for visitors.

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Abbey Road was The Beatles’ last recorded album and Macmillan, who was a friend of Yoko Ono and John Lennon, was asked to take possible cover shots for both the front and back covers. So on the 8th August 1969, the photographer climbed a ladder in the middle of Abbey Road and for the next ten minutes took six photographs of them walking back and forth over the crossing. It was Paul McCartney who chose the fifth image to be the album’s cover. When taking the road sign for the back cover a young girl in a blue dress walked through the shot to the photographer’s annoyance. However as you know this became the shot used.

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Although an individual ‘outtake’ print of The Beatles walking ‘backwards’ was sold by Bloomsbury Auctions in May 2012 for £16,000 it is thought that this is the first time that a complete signed and numbered suite of the photographs has come under the hammer. Their estimate is £50,000-£70,000 and they will be on view from the 16th November until the auction on the Friday.

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http://www.bloomsburyauctions.com

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