Treasure Houses: The homes of the Dukes of Buccleuch and Queensberry

 

BOUGHTON

The House, its People and its Collections

By Richard, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg

Published by Caique Publishing Ltd
ISBN 978 0 9565948 5 3 
£17.95 / $21.80 / 81.41 TL 

 

 

 

BOWHILL

The House, its People and its Paintings

Introduced by Richard, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Edited by John Montagu Douglas Scott

Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg

Published by Caique Publishing Ltd
ISBN 978 0 9565948 2 2
£12.95 / $15.73 / 58.73 TL
 

 

DRUMLANRIG

The Castle, its People and its Paintings

By Richard, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg

Published by Caique Publishing Ltd
ISBN 978 0 9565948 4 6
£10.95 / $13.30 / 49.66 TL
Paperback, 96 pages, Second Edition
 

These three guidebooks are much more than just that as they provide a fascinating introduction to the houses and collections of the incumbent Dukes.  You will encounter Rembrandt, Canaletto, Van Dyck and El Greco, as well as family portraits by Gainsborough, Reynolds and Ramsay, There are miniatures, French and English furniture, Sèvres made for Louis XV, items commemorating Sir Walter Scott and the Duke of Monmouth, silver and a huge variety of textiles and rugs. It is an extensive and engaging collection in three very different houses, two, Bowhill and Drumlanrig, are in Scotland and then Boughton in England which the late John Cornforth once described as ‘the English Versailles’.

These books are of serious appeal to anyone interested in the fine and decorative arts, architecture and historic interiors.

http://www.bowhillhouse.co.uk

http://www.boughtonhouse.co.uk

http://www.drumlanrigcastle.co.uk

http://www.caiquepublishing.com

 

Auction Alert: Rare Pair of Royal Sèvres Vases, Bonhams London, 14th June 2017

This pair is part of a group of thirteen vases which were made in 1778-1779 of either soft or hard paste. They are believed to have been a gift from Louis XVI to his sister-in-law the comtesse d’Artois. Both are decorated with Chinoiserie sea battles and on each vase a ship is depicted bearing a shield with the French Royal arms.

 They appear in Bonhams New Bond Street sale of Fine European Ceramics on June 14th:

 

A pair of Sèvres hard-paste vases, circa 1778
© Bonhams

217

A PAIR OF SÈVRES HARD-PASTE VASES, CIRCA 1778

Vases bouc du Barry, painted by Jean-Jacques Dieu with polychrome chinoiserie sea battles and flying insects, outlined in gilding, applied with gilt goat’s head handles, draped and tied goatskins below the scene and gilt flower garlands suspended from the necks, gilt collars around the necks and gilt borders to the moulded rims, 30cm high, crowned interlaced LL marks in red enclosing date letter AA (one smudged), painter’s mark for Dieu and gilder’s mark for Jean Chauvaux (le jeune) (one with a goat’s head horn replaced and two chips to foot) (2)

 

£70,000-90,000

 

Provenance:
William Stephen Poyntz (1770-1840), thence to his daughter;
Georgiana Elizabeth, Countess Spencer (nee Poyntz);
The Earls Spencer, Althorp, Northamptonshire;
London art market, from 1986 (according to Sassoon, see below Literature)

Literature:
R.J. Charleston, Sèvres and Other French Porcelain in Earl Spencer’s Collection at Althorp, in The Connoisseur 173 (February, 1970), pp. 77-86, fig. 11;
R. Savill, A Pair of Sèvres Vases: From the Collection of Sir Richard Wallace to the J. Paul Getty Museum, in The J. Paul Getty Museum Journal. vol. 14 (1986), p. 138;
S. Eriksen & G. de Bellaigue, Sèvres Porcelain – Vincennes and Sèvres 1740-1800 (1987), p. 331f, no. 142;
R. Savill, The Wallace Collection Catalogue of Sèvres Porcelain (1988), II, p. 625;
A. Sassoon, Vincennes and Sèvres Porcelain: Catalogue of the Collections, The J. Paul Getty Museum (1992), no. 23, n. 19

 

http://www.bonhams.com

Jane Austen’s Portraits

The Mysterious Miss Austen, The Gallery, Winchester Discovery Centre, Jewry Street
Winchester, until 24th July, 2017

Jane Austen by James Andrews, watercolour, 1869
(c) Private collection, courtesy of the 19th Century Rare Book and Photograph Shop, Stevenson, Maryland.

I had of course known about Jane Austen for many years but had not actually read one of her novels until I was in my early twenties and found out what an absolute delight they are. I knew something of her life (I just passed where she stayed in Covent Garden’s Henrietta Street this morning) but it was a real delight to come and see this exhibition which marks the two hundredth anniversary of her death and which not only brings together five portraits of her under the same roof for the first time, but includes letters, items of clothing and a manuscript alternative ending to her final novel Persuasion, which was not used in the end. There are also items from both an English and an American private collection which bring the story up-to-date and the rather fine ceramic vase Jane Austen in E 17 by Grayson Perry has been loaned as well.

Installation view:
Jane Austen Pelisse coat

I found it unexpectedly moving and although as the exhibition’s title suggests she does remain somewhat mysterious I felt I had at least encountered her. It was therefore wholly appropriate to pay my respects as I bowed my head to read the inscription on the tablet set into the floor of the north aisle in nearby Winchester Cathedral, commemorating her life and burial there.

Jane Austen ledgerstone – Winchester Cathedral by John Crook

https://hampshireculturaltrust.org.uk/the-gallery-at-winchester-discovery-centre

Installation View:
Jane Austen portraits display

Bouke de Vries

Bouke de Vries -“Fractured Images”, Kristin Hjellegjerde Gallery Ltd., 533 Old York Road, London SW18, 8th June – 15th July 2017 

 

Grown from Chinese clay, 2017
18th century Chinese porcelain fragments and mixed media
150x120x580

I believe that we owe a great debt of gratitude to Bouke de Vries for his belief, which reflects that held in China and Japan, that broken important ceramic pieces are worthy of repair. He has said “I wanted to give these objects, which are regarded as valueless, a new story and move their history forwards. A broken object can still be as beautiful as a perfect object.” It is a great philosophy and thanks to his artistic imagination and great skill – he is a ceramics conservator – he has created some wonderful pieces.

Map of china of China, 2017
18th and 19th century Chinese porcelain fragments and mixed media
11220×960 mm

This show of works reflect the enduring role of China in the production of ceramics worldwide over the centuries. His works are thought-provoking, sometimes humorous, but always engrossing. He has specially created a new non-ceramic work for the exhibition – a plaster doll of a Chinese dancer which combines the old with the new through his use of computer circuit boards.

Jar carrier, 2017
Han dynasty figure and 15th century Chinese porcelain marine archaeology jars and marble
250x250x109 mm

 

www.kristinhjellegjerde.com

 

 

PS: You can also see:
Bouke De Vries: War and pieces, Berrington Hall, Herefordshire
Until 05 November 2017

 

White Ceramics Win!

An Exhibition and Sale: Inspired by Blanc de Chine – The Anthony Collection of White Porcelain, Stockspring Antiques, 114 Kensington Church St, London W8, 7th – 14th June 2017

Mennecy pot-pourri and cover, c. 1750-55

There is something alluring about white porcelain where the only decoration is moulded or applied giving the pieces a sculptural quality and one can quite understand why collectors such as Thelma Chrysler Foy and Mrs Charles Allen Jnr were drawn to it.

St Cloud cups and saucers, left c. 1720-40; right c. 1730-50

Now this exciting collection of more than one hundred and ten pieces of porcelain – Chinese, French, Italian, English and Meissen – dating from c1640 – c1795 gives collectors a great chance to acquire fine examples of this genre.

Meissen coffee pot and cover, c. 1725-30

Garnered over a period of around twenty years the Anthony Collection reveals the influence of Chinese blanc de Chine on European porcelain factories and how these factories then created shapes that were European in origin. It is a fascinating visual feast.

Bow sucriers, c. 1752-54

http://www.antique-porcelain.co.uk

Stories Unfold!

Every Object Tells a Story, 5 Cromwell Place, London SW7, until 5th July 2017

Installation view
(photo credit: Exhibition Design and Photograph by Charles Marsden-Smedley)

In May 2015 I shared with you the eponymous exhibition Oliver Hoare held at 33 Fitzroy Square, London W1 (Curiosities, 12 May 2015).  This new edition in the former studio of Sir John Lavery RA is even larger, beautifully displayed and crammed with some four hundred intriguing objects which you just do want to learn more about. There is a wonderful catalogue to help achieve that.

Installation view
(photo credit: Exhibition Design and Photograph by Charles Marsden-Smedley)

I shall let Oliver Hoare sum it up: “What is assembled here might look like a modern ‘Cabinet of Curiosities’, an assemblage of the exotic and curious from the four quarters of the world. There is an intention behind it, however, that goes beyond presenting a wide variety of curiosities. We are today linked up to all those four quarters, and while a huge amount of information is available to us, unlike to those who awaited the ships in the ports of Amsterdam, Genoa, Lisbon, London, Marseille, Seville or Venice, the horizon of what interests us seems to have shrunk. The art market is an interesting barometer of this shrinkage. The point is, therefore, that we can connect with the whole world on a more profound level than can be gained from package touring, through the possession of, and study of even the most modest objects of different cultures. The purpose of collecting, as Molière might have put it, should not be limited to becoming rich through the investment in one’s purchases, but to become enriched through the intelligent possession of what one has acquired.”

 

Installation view
(photo credit: Exhibition Design and Photograph by Charles Marsden-Smedley)

Opening hours:
Tuesday to Sunday, 11am to 6pm
(Closed on Mondays (except by appointment))

www.everyobjecttellsastory.com

A message to you all

It is now twenty-two years since I first started writing about art and antiques in London and they have been great fun years. I am so truly grateful to all who have read my pieces whether regularly or occasionally.

As my partner is finally retiring and because of some health issues I have decided that now is probably as good a time as any to cut back on the number of blogs I post.  It will be a difficult and somewhat painful exercise as it has been a 24/7 routine but over the next month or so you will see a reduction in the number of blogs. However this is not farewell as I shall still continue to share exhibitions, events and books with you.

At BAFTA, 30th April 2017