Treasure Houses: The homes of the Dukes of Buccleuch and Queensberry

 

BOUGHTON

The House, its People and its Collections

By Richard, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg

Published by Caique Publishing Ltd
ISBN 978 0 9565948 5 3 
£17.95 / $21.80 / 81.41 TL 

 

 

 

BOWHILL

The House, its People and its Paintings

Introduced by Richard, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Edited by John Montagu Douglas Scott

Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg

Published by Caique Publishing Ltd
ISBN 978 0 9565948 2 2
£12.95 / $15.73 / 58.73 TL
 

 

DRUMLANRIG

The Castle, its People and its Paintings

By Richard, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg

Published by Caique Publishing Ltd
ISBN 978 0 9565948 4 6
£10.95 / $13.30 / 49.66 TL
Paperback, 96 pages, Second Edition
 

These three guidebooks are much more than just that as they provide a fascinating introduction to the houses and collections of the incumbent Dukes.  You will encounter Rembrandt, Canaletto, Van Dyck and El Greco, as well as family portraits by Gainsborough, Reynolds and Ramsay, There are miniatures, French and English furniture, Sèvres made for Louis XV, items commemorating Sir Walter Scott and the Duke of Monmouth, silver and a huge variety of textiles and rugs. It is an extensive and engaging collection in three very different houses, two, Bowhill and Drumlanrig, are in Scotland and then Boughton in England which the late John Cornforth once described as ‘the English Versailles’.

These books are of serious appeal to anyone interested in the fine and decorative arts, architecture and historic interiors.

http://www.bowhillhouse.co.uk

http://www.boughtonhouse.co.uk

http://www.drumlanrigcastle.co.uk

http://www.caiquepublishing.com

 

Auction Alert: Rare Pair of Royal Sèvres Vases, Bonhams London, 14th June 2017

This pair is part of a group of thirteen vases which were made in 1778-1779 of either soft or hard paste. They are believed to have been a gift from Louis XVI to his sister-in-law the comtesse d’Artois. Both are decorated with Chinoiserie sea battles and on each vase a ship is depicted bearing a shield with the French Royal arms.

 They appear in Bonhams New Bond Street sale of Fine European Ceramics on June 14th:

 

A pair of Sèvres hard-paste vases, circa 1778
© Bonhams

217

A PAIR OF SÈVRES HARD-PASTE VASES, CIRCA 1778

Vases bouc du Barry, painted by Jean-Jacques Dieu with polychrome chinoiserie sea battles and flying insects, outlined in gilding, applied with gilt goat’s head handles, draped and tied goatskins below the scene and gilt flower garlands suspended from the necks, gilt collars around the necks and gilt borders to the moulded rims, 30cm high, crowned interlaced LL marks in red enclosing date letter AA (one smudged), painter’s mark for Dieu and gilder’s mark for Jean Chauvaux (le jeune) (one with a goat’s head horn replaced and two chips to foot) (2)

 

£70,000-90,000

 

Provenance:
William Stephen Poyntz (1770-1840), thence to his daughter;
Georgiana Elizabeth, Countess Spencer (nee Poyntz);
The Earls Spencer, Althorp, Northamptonshire;
London art market, from 1986 (according to Sassoon, see below Literature)

Literature:
R.J. Charleston, Sèvres and Other French Porcelain in Earl Spencer’s Collection at Althorp, in The Connoisseur 173 (February, 1970), pp. 77-86, fig. 11;
R. Savill, A Pair of Sèvres Vases: From the Collection of Sir Richard Wallace to the J. Paul Getty Museum, in The J. Paul Getty Museum Journal. vol. 14 (1986), p. 138;
S. Eriksen & G. de Bellaigue, Sèvres Porcelain – Vincennes and Sèvres 1740-1800 (1987), p. 331f, no. 142;
R. Savill, The Wallace Collection Catalogue of Sèvres Porcelain (1988), II, p. 625;
A. Sassoon, Vincennes and Sèvres Porcelain: Catalogue of the Collections, The J. Paul Getty Museum (1992), no. 23, n. 19

 

http://www.bonhams.com

Bouke de Vries

Bouke de Vries -“Fractured Images”, Kristin Hjellegjerde Gallery Ltd., 533 Old York Road, London SW18, 8th June – 15th July 2017 

 

Grown from Chinese clay, 2017
18th century Chinese porcelain fragments and mixed media
150x120x580

I believe that we owe a great debt of gratitude to Bouke de Vries for his belief, which reflects that held in China and Japan, that broken important ceramic pieces are worthy of repair. He has said “I wanted to give these objects, which are regarded as valueless, a new story and move their history forwards. A broken object can still be as beautiful as a perfect object.” It is a great philosophy and thanks to his artistic imagination and great skill – he is a ceramics conservator – he has created some wonderful pieces.

Map of china of China, 2017
18th and 19th century Chinese porcelain fragments and mixed media
11220×960 mm

This show of works reflect the enduring role of China in the production of ceramics worldwide over the centuries. His works are thought-provoking, sometimes humorous, but always engrossing. He has specially created a new non-ceramic work for the exhibition – a plaster doll of a Chinese dancer which combines the old with the new through his use of computer circuit boards.

Jar carrier, 2017
Han dynasty figure and 15th century Chinese porcelain marine archaeology jars and marble
250x250x109 mm

 

www.kristinhjellegjerde.com

 

 

PS: You can also see:
Bouke De Vries: War and pieces, Berrington Hall, Herefordshire
Until 05 November 2017

 

White Ceramics Win!

An Exhibition and Sale: Inspired by Blanc de Chine – The Anthony Collection of White Porcelain, Stockspring Antiques, 114 Kensington Church St, London W8, 7th – 14th June 2017

Mennecy pot-pourri and cover, c. 1750-55

There is something alluring about white porcelain where the only decoration is moulded or applied giving the pieces a sculptural quality and one can quite understand why collectors such as Thelma Chrysler Foy and Mrs Charles Allen Jnr were drawn to it.

St Cloud cups and saucers, left c. 1720-40; right c. 1730-50

Now this exciting collection of more than one hundred and ten pieces of porcelain – Chinese, French, Italian, English and Meissen – dating from c1640 – c1795 gives collectors a great chance to acquire fine examples of this genre.

Meissen coffee pot and cover, c. 1725-30

Garnered over a period of around twenty years the Anthony Collection reveals the influence of Chinese blanc de Chine on European porcelain factories and how these factories then created shapes that were European in origin. It is a fascinating visual feast.

Bow sucriers, c. 1752-54

http://www.antique-porcelain.co.uk

Tribal Art and Ceramics in London’s New Bond Street

I take pleasure in sharing these two shows with you. They are at The Fine Art Society 148 New Bond Street, London W1.

 

Gordon Reece – The Art of Collecting, until 16th June 2017 

DSC_6706
30 Zula People, Democratic Republic of Congo
Female caryatid stool
First half of the 20th century
Wood
Height 18 1/2 in (47 cm)
Provenance: Private collection, Rwanda

This collaboration with Gordon Reece the esteemed dealer in Asian and African artefacts is a veritable treat.  His love of the objects is reflected in what he buys and they are eminently liveable with as this show which sees them displayed among the Fine Art Society’s furniture and artworks skilfully proves. A great celebration of Tribal Art.

‘Installation view, including two Lega masks and a Suku standing figure’

 

DSC_6725
41 Bembe People, Democratic Republic of Congo
A rare standing reliquary figure (Muzidi)
First half of the 20th century
Cane, fibre, cloth and buttons
Height 41 in (104.1 cm)
Provenance: Private collection, USA; purchased by Gordon Reece Gallery in New York in 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hylton Nel – For Use and Display, until 16th June 2017

Hylton Nel
Cat with Pope’s shoes

The South African ceramicist Hylton Nel shows his flair for creating both useful and decorative objects. You will discern influences from Chinese, Staffordshire and European ceramics in them and he uses many ideas in their decoration whether sexual, whimsical or written prose.  A delight and one understands why his works are eagerly snapped up.

Hylton Nel
Green Tree and Figures

 

Hylton Nel
A Game of Notes

 

 

www.thefineartsociety.com/

Lord Weidenfeld

The Collection of The late Lord Weidenfeld GBE: A Life of Ideals and Ideas, Christie’s, 8 King Street, St James’s, London SW1, 18th May 2017

Lot 509
Bernardo Cavallino (Naples 1616–?1656)
Saint Dorothy
oil on canvas
27.7/8 x 22.7/8 in. (72 x 58 cm.)
Estimate: £150,000-200,000
© Christie’s Images Limited 2017

This is a very rare and final chance to see the private world of the publisher and philanthropist George Weidenfeld (1919-2016). He was created Baron Weidenfeld of Chelsea in 1976. He had co-founded the famous publishing firm Weidenfeld and Nicolson in 1948. It was after the War too that he started collecting and this auction reveals his many interests – Old Master paintings, 20th century works on paper, furniture, sculpture and the decorative arts. His collection of books is left to the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem.

The dining room of Lord Weidenfeld’s Bennison decorated Chelsea apartment
© Christie’s Images Limited 2017

The setting for this very personal collection was Lord Weidenfeld’s Chelsea Embankment apartment which had been wonderfully decorated for him by the famous antique dealer and decorator Geoffrey Bennison and which remained virtually unchanged for over forty years!

Lot 569
A REPOUSSÉ PARCEL-GILT COPPER BUST OF POPE URBAN VIII
WORKSHOP OF GIAN LORENZO BERNINI, ROME, MID-17TH CENTURY
30 in. high, 24 in. wide, the bust and socle
Estimate: £30,000-50,000
© Christie’s Images Limited 2017

 

Lot 577
A REGENCY BRASS-INLAID INDIAN ROSEWOOD LIBRARY TABLE
CIRCA 1810-20, ATTRIBUTED TO GILLOWS
31.1/4 in. (79 cm.) high; 76.1/2 in. (194.5 cm.) wide; 48.1/2 in. (123.5 cm.) deep
Estimate: £40,000-60,000
© Christie’s Images Limited 2017

 

Lot 582
A LARGE CHINESE BLUE AND WHITE BALUSTER VASE FITTED AS A TABLE LAMP
19TH CENTURY
The porcelain, 17.1/4 in. (44 cm.) high
Estimate: £2,000-4,000
© Christie’s Images Limited 2017

 

 

 

 

http://www.christies.com

Exquisite ceramics!

Kensuke Fujiyoshi, Sladmore Contemporary, 32 Bruton Place, London W1, until 26th May 2017

Kensuke Fujiyoshi, Japanese, b.1966
‘Small Rhino (colours)’, unique ceramic, 2.5″ x 3.2″ x 1.1″

The delightful miniature figures, boxes and sculptures produced by the Japanese ceramicist Kensuke Fujiyoshi are all his own work from start to finish.  They are a contemporary interpretation of traditional Japanese artwork and there can be little doubt as to why they are so eagerly sought by collectors and lovers of ceramic art.

Kensuke Fujiyoshi, Japanese, b.1966
‘Prawns box’, unique ceramic, 3.5″ x 2.7″ x 2.7″

http://www.sladmorecontemporary.com

Early Maiolica

Maiolica before Raphael, Sam Fogg, 15D Clifford Street, London, W1, 8th May – 16th June 2017

A three-colour jug showing a
half-length figure in profile
Florentine district, Montelupo or Bacchereto
c. 1420–40

It will come as no surprise that it has taken leading medieval art specialist and dealer Sam Fogg many years to bring together the more than forty examples of late-medieval and early Renaissance pieces of maiolica which make up this important exhibition. The first such show for a hundred years!

Large dish with a bust-length portrait
of a young man
Deruta
c. 1470–80

Most of use when thinking of maiolica bring to our mind the istoriato pieces with their decoration of mythological, historic or religious scenes but this exhibition reveals the earlier period before Raphael – the era of Donatello, Mantegna and Botticelli.

Large albarello with an owl and a stork
Montelupo
c. 1430–50

The tin white glaze applied to the earthenware pieces was decorated with motifs inspired by textiles, metalwork and the lusterware of Islamic Spain.  These were exciting and original and one can easily understand why some contemporary buyers valued them more highly than precious metals.

Inkstand with figures of the Virtues
Probably Faenza
c. 1480–90

The accompanying catalogue celebrates contemporary scholarship with a foreword by Timothy Wilson, and essays by Elisa Sani and Justin Raccanello which look at both the evolution of the pottery and the story of the collecting of Italian pre-Renaissance pottery up until the present day.

 

http://www.samfogg.com

Ceramic temptations!

Ceramic Art London 2017, Central Saint Martins, Granary Square, Kings Cross, London N1, 31st March – 2nd April 2017

Midori Takaki
The land of Archaeopteryx, 2016
Hand-built, stoneware, underglaze, slip and glaze
Dimensions: 18.0cm W, 17.0 H, 5.0 D

As someone who likes ceramics I find it both encouraging and exciting that contemporary ceramics are becoming more eagerly collected and appreciated.  Now in its thirteenth year this year’s fair has ninety participants offering a wide variety of pieces.

Sophie Southgate
Spectrum Series
Group of 15 pieces
Dimensions: 1m x 1m x 1m

The natural world – whether rural or urban in nature – provides the inspiration for many of the artists.  Be warned though as I am sure many of you will be tempted to purchase a work whether a practical item such as a delightful teacup or something intensely sculptural. With prices from £25 upwards there are choices to suit all pockets.

Nichola Theakston
Beyond Him no.6
Coil built construction in Black stoneware and terracotta paperclay.
Applied slips.
Dimensions: 53 x 53cm

http://www.ceramicartlondon.com/

Fit for an 18th century dining table!

Four Private Collections – including a collection of ceramic handled cutlery, Stockspring Antiques, 114 Kensington Church St, London W8, 27th March – 4th April 2017

A boxed set of Worcester knives and forks c. 1758-60, in a ray skin covered standing box lined with crimson silk velvet and silver braid with twelve pairs of knives and forks, English steel blades of scimitar shape and three pronged forks with silver ferrules.

This exhibition comprises ceramics from four different private collections and includes Japanese and Worcester porcelains and a group of cane handles.  Of special note is the collection of more than seventy pieces of ceramic handled cutlery.  The majority of these are French and English but there are some interesting examples of Chinese and Continental porcelain too. They provide an exciting and fascinating guide to not only the changes in ceramic handle shapes but also the development and dating of the silver and steel fittings during the course of the 18th century.

A Bow knife and fork, painted in polychrome with the crest of Moses (Luis) Mendes, c. 1756, a merchant in the City of London.

www.antique-porcelain.co.uk