Les Colombes in Salisbury, until 22nd July 2018  

Doves

Les Colombes – Salisbury Cathedral

Les Colombes, an installation which started out as a commemoration of the end of the First World War, has gained even greater significance since the nerve agent attack earlier this year in this historic city.  Doves are a symbol of peace and hope and so totally appropriate as an antidote to the events that took place here.

IMG_20180509_165007

Michael Pendry installing Les Colombes in Salisbury Cathedral, 9th May 2018

The artist Michael Pendry has exhibited these works at various places around the world and encourages local people to create new doves to add to the total number and has done the same here in Salisbury Cathedral where some 2,500 ‘fly’ in the nave.

IMG_20180509_171637

Les Colombes reflected in William Pye’s font in Salisbury Cathedral

The step of taking the doves into the shops and city is a beautiful one for it spreads the message of peace and hope into the community and perhaps, just as following the descent of the Holy Spirit onto the apostles at Pentecost enabled the Apostles to be understood by people of different nations, it will be one that resonates with the many visitors that come here from around the World.

Doves in Casa Fina, High Street, Salisbury (c)

Doves in Casa Fina, High Street, Salisbury (c)

The artist says of his work: “Although the doves are folded by different people in their unity they stand for a fundamental human right – the right to peace and freedom. The time has come to declare ourselves and to stand up for this! May the flock of doves grow, from place to place, from country to country, and across all borders. Peace, freedom, and sustainability in a world of change and disturbance are the key themes of my installations.”

May his words as we approach Pentecost 2018 be heard both near and afar and acted upon.

IMG_20180509_171656

Reflections in Salisbury Cathedral

https://www.salisburycathedral.org.uk/

http://www.michaelpendry.de/

https://www.visitwiltshire.co.uk/salisbury

www.casafinasalisbury.co.uk

#SalisburyCityofDoves

 

A Gallery Selection!

Anya GallaccioBeautiful Minds, Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 Duke Street, St James’s, SW1, until 25th March 2017

Installation view, Anya Gallaccio, Beautiful Minds, 2015 -2017.
Thomas Dane Gallery, London, 2017. Photo: Todd White Art Photography

Paisley-born artist Anya Gallaccio follows in the gallery’s tradition for large-scale works in this space as the whole gallery space is given over to a giant 3D clay printer which will for the course of the exhibition be printing a scaled effigy of the monolithic Devil’s Tower in Wyoming.  It is an interesting exercise because slip clay is not a reliable material and it is that which factors into the artist’s creative process for this fascinating project.

 

http://www.thomasdanegallery.com/

Printing times: 1-3pm, Tuesday to Saturday (subject to change)

 

Kazuo Shiraga, Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond Street, London W1, until 25th March 2017

Installation view of Kazuo Shiraga
Courtesy of Lévy Gorvy

It is quite surprising that this is the Japanese artist’s first London solo exhibition for a decade. Shiraga (1924-2008) was a founder member of the avant-garde group Gutai and was well known for his method of foot painting while suspended from the ceiling and using his feet to spread the paint across the canvas to create the powerful abstract images.  The works on show are chiefly from the early 60s; a period when he was attaining international interest.

http://www.levygorvy.com

 

Tim Noble and Sue Webster – STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS, Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1, until 25th March 2017

Installation view, Tim Noble and Sue Webster, STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS, 2017,
Courtesy the artists and Blain|Southern, Photo: Peter Mallet

For their third exhibition at the gallery Tim Noble and Sue Webster have produced a completely new body of work with a series of giant self-portraits created in twisted bronze.

Normally the artists react to their everyday urban environment but this time the electrical wire maquettes for these works were started while they had a residency on the island of St Bart’s. The sculptures depiction of their naked forms reflect their artistic personae and do so in a direct, possibly to some, challenging way.

 

http://www.blainsouthern.com

 

Shinkichi Tajiri, The Mayor Gallery, 21 Cork Street, (1st Floor), London W1, until 31st March 2017

Installation shot from Shinkichi Tajiri,
Courtesy of The Mayor Gallery.

Shinkichi Tajiri (1923 – 2009) was born in the USA the child of immigrant Japanese parents.  Following Pearl Harbour the war saw him and his family in an internment camp and to escape this he enlisted in the American Army’s all-Japanese regiment.  The horrors of war that he experienced are reflected in the violence tinged with eroticism that are a feature of his pieces. The works on view date from between 1955 and 1963.

http://www.mayorgallery.com

 

Matt Stokes:Dead Sea Deaf Sea‘, Workplace London, 61 Conduit Street, Mayfair, London W1, until 1st April 2017

Installation view: Matt Stokes: Dead Sea Deaf Sea – Workplace London,
Courtesy of the artist and Workplace, UK

This is Matt Stokes’s first solo exhibition at the London gallery and it is a very thought-provoking one for by looking at HMS Standard, the WWII psychiatric rehabilitation camp and at both its main purpose – to heal and help – and the less obvious one – to deal with malingerers trying to avoid active service – the viewer is confronted by their own ‘fragility’ and the socio-political influences on our daily lives.

 

http://www.workplacegallery.co.uk/

(Open Thursday – Friday 10 am – 5pm, and by appointment)

 

At home with the Gee Family

Lives, Loves and Loss: Traces at Fenton House, Fenton House and Garden, Hampstead Grove, London NW3, until 23rd December 2016

Lives Loves and Loss - Traces at Fenton House Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

Lives Loves and Loss – Traces at Fenton House
Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

Fenton House is a delightful 17th century brick merchant’s house with a walled garden that was left to the National Trust in 1952 by Lady Binning.  This month it has been transformed by Traces, a group of curators and makers, into a different multi-sensory world.

Lives Loves and Loss - Traces at Fenton House Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

Lives Loves and Loss – Traces at Fenton House
Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

They take us into the world of the Gee family in 1730. The family were important silk and linen merchants in London who resided at Fenton House at that time. The visitor equipped with a chamberstick (battery version) wanders through the abandoned rooms and learns, as the title suggests, about the goings on of their lives.  The rooms are specially lit to give an idea of how life was before gaslight or electricity. To help tell the story the work of eighty contemporary artists has been used and the good news is that these art works can be purchased.

Lives Loves and Loss - Traces at Fenton House Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

Lives Loves and Loss – Traces at Fenton House
Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

National Trust London’s Creative Director, Joseph Watson, comments: “Known for its rich history and inspiring collections the best of contemporary craft, design and art seemed the perfect way to tell this part of Fenton House’s story. Offering an escape from the bustle of Christmas, we are certain visitors will be amazed by the transformation that Traces have brought to this historic London home.”

Diana Bliss Annies Apron Lives Loves and Loss - Traces at Fenton House Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

Diana Bliss Annies Apron Lives Loves and Loss – Traces at Fenton House
Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

 

Opening Hours
Saturday 3rd – Sunday 4th, 11am – 5pm (last admission at 4.30pm)
Thursday 8th, Thursday 15th, 5.30pm – 8.30pm (last admission at 8pm)
Saturday 10th – Sunday 11th, 11am – 5pm (last admission at 4.30pm)
Saturday 17th – Friday 23rd, 11am – 5pm (last admission at 4.30pm)
All tickets must be booked in advance, including for National Trust members, from http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/fenton-house-and-garden, 0344 249 1895
Admission National Trust members – free
Adult day – £10
Child day – £5
Adult evening (includes complimentary drink) – £15
Please note that the evening openings are not suitable for children under the age of 18. Ticket price applies to all, including National Trust members, for evening admission.
Lives Loves and Loss - Traces at Fenton House Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

Lives Loves and Loss – Traces at Fenton House
Photo by Sophia Schorr-Kon

 

@NTLovesLondon, @NTFentonHouse, @traceslondon

Marian Goodman Gallery

James Coleman, Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1, until 16th April 2016

JAMES COLEMAN Untitled, 2011-15 LED Video installation with audio, colour. Photographer: Matthew Hollow Copyright: James Coleman Courtesy of: the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery

JAMES COLEMAN
Untitled, 2011-15
LED Video installation with audio, colour.
Photographer: Matthew Hollow
Copyright: James Coleman Courtesy of: the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery

This show combines some of the artist’s earlier well-known works with two new major film installations that he has worked on over the last five years. One can easily understand why he has influenced younger artists because his work combines elegance with beauty in a manner which captures the imagination of the onlooker.

JAMES COLEMAN Photograph, 1998-99 Projected slide images with synchronised audio narration; 35mm slides, colour. Continuous projection; duration 20 mins, interval 2 mins 30 secs. Photographer: Matthew Hollow Copyright: James Coleman Courtesy of: the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery

JAMES COLEMAN
Photograph, 1998-99 Projected slide images with
synchronised audio narration; 35mm slides, colour.
Continuous projection; duration 20 mins, interval 2 mins 30
secs.
Photographer: Matthew Hollow
Copyright: James Coleman Courtesy of: the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery

mariangoodman.com

Hauser & Wirth

Mark Wallinger ID, Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1, until 7th May 2016

Mark Wallinger id Painting 37 2015 Acrylic on canvas 360 x 180 cm / 141 3/4 x 70 7/8 in Photo: Alex Delfanne

Mark Wallinger
id Painting 37
2015
Acrylic on canvas
360 x 180 cm / 141 3/4 x 70 7/8 in
Photo: Alex Delfanne

This is the artist’s first solo exhibition with the gallery and indeed it takes place in both their North and South galleries as there is much to capture our attention and I shall give a taste of it here.  As its title might suggest the artist has used Freud’s terms id, ego and superego as a basis for his works.  The large Id paintings involve the viewer as they become involved with what feelings the artist is portraying.

Superego 2016 Stainless steel, glass mirror, motor 350 x 160 x 160 cm / 137 3/4 x 63 x 63 in Photo: Alex Delfanne

Superego
2016
Stainless steel, glass mirror, motor
350 x 160 x 160 cm /
137 3/4 x 63 x 63 in
Photo: Alex Delfanne

The mirrored sculpture Superego – inspired by the Scotland Yard sign – dominates us and impedes us because despite the reflective nature of its material we are unable to see ourselves in it. His new video work is Orrery.  An orrery is of course a model that shows the solar system and for his video Wallinger depicts the New Fairlop Oak which sits in the centre of the Fulwell Cross roundabout in Barkingside taken from a car.  The revolving world around the tree is both representational of Britain and also our planet’s orbit around the sun and thus our place in the universe.

Mark Wallinger Orrery (film stills) 2016 4-channel video installation, sound 4 minutes 37 seconds looped

Mark Wallinger
Orrery (film stills)
2016
4-channel video installation, sound
4 minutes 37 seconds looped

 

http://www.hauserwirth.info

Barry Flanagan

Barry Flanagan, Animal, Vegetable, Mineral, Waddington Custot Galleries, 11 Cork Street, London W1, until 14th May 2016

Barry Flanagan: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral is at Waddington Custot Galleries 4 March – 14 May 2016 www.waddingtoncustot.com

Barry Flanagan: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral is at Waddington Custot Galleries 4 March – 14 May 2016
http://www.waddingtoncustot.com

Curated by Dr Jo Melvin, this exhibition looks at the works from this noted sculptor who was a part of early British Conceptual Art. He worked in a variety of materials – sand, plaster, cloth, metal, stone and bronze – and one can correctly discern a note of irreverence in his approach.  In his film sand girl (1970) where sand is poured over a naked woman the viewer becomes an element in the “sculptural” process.

Barry Flanagan: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral is at Waddington Custot Galleries 4 March – 14 May 2016 www.waddingtoncustot.com

Barry Flanagan: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral is at Waddington Custot Galleries 4 March – 14 May 2016
http://www.waddingtoncustot.com

The show’s title comes from a review by the American writer and curator Gene Baro of Flanagan’s first solo show at the Rowan Gallery.  I shall share Barry Flanagan’s own words about his work with you: All materials are sculptural. I experience the physical world in nature and the physical world in our built structures, as sculptural

http://www.waddingtoncustot.com