Celebrating the Image – Three London Exhibitions

Avedon Warhol, Gagosian, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1, until 23rd April 2016

My camera and I, together we have the power to confer or to take away.

—Richard Avedon

Richard Avedon Audrey Hepburn, actress, New York, January 20, 1967 Photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation

Richard Avedon
Audrey Hepburn, actress, New York, January 20, 1967
Photograph by Richard Avedon
© The Richard Avedon Foundation

 

This is a major exhibition which celebrates two outstanding post-war talents whose common link was portraiture which they often repeated or serialized. Avedon, of course through photography and Warhol through his screen prints. It is a delightful experience and well worth a visit.

Andy Warhol Miriam Davidson , 1965 Spray paint and silkscreen ink on canvas 80 1/4 x 80 1/2 inches 203.8 x 204.5cm Private Collection © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Andy Warhol
Miriam Davidson , 1965
Spray paint and
silkscreen ink on canvas
80 1/4 x 80 1/2 inches
203.8 x 204.5cm
Private Collection © 2015 The Andy Warhol
Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights
Society (ARS), New York.

They always say that time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.

—Andy Warhol

http://www.gagosian.com

 

 

Vogue 100: A Century of Style, National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London WC2, until 22nd May 2016

The Beatles, by Peter Laurie, 1964 Condé Nast Archive London

The Beatles, by Peter Laurie, 1964 Condé Nast Archive London

The British version of Vogue was started a hundred years ago during the First World War as it was no longer possible to ship Vogue from America. It was an instant hit and continues to this very day to be at the forefront of fashion design and photography as the many images in this exhibition celebrate.

 

http://www.npg.org.uk

 

 

Performing for the Camera, Tate Modern, The Eyal Ofer Galleries, Level 3, Bankside, London SE1, until 12thJune 2016

Claude Cahun, 1894 - 1954 Self Portrait 1927 Image courtesy of the Wilson Centre for Photography

Claude Cahun, 1894 – 1954
Self Portrait
1927
Image courtesy of the Wilson Centre for Photography

Some five hundred images, ranging from the beginning of photography to our “selfie” age of today illustrate how the relationship between photography and performance has developed. Sometimes it becomes serious art while at other times is more humorous and relaxed. It is a history that has strong resonance as any of us could be a “performer” caught in a camera lens.

Erwin Wurm, b.1954 One Minute Sculpture, 1997 c-print Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong

Erwin Wurm, b.1954
One Minute Sculpture, 1997
c-print
Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong

http://www.tate.org.uk

 

HERMAN SELLESLAGS

HERMAN SELLESLAGS: THE ARCHIVES, 88-Gallery, 86-88 Pimlico Road, London SW1, until 24th October 2015

Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin,1970 © Herman Selleslags courtesy of 88-Gallery

Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin,1970
© Herman Selleslags courtesy of 88-Gallery

There is still a chance to go and see this fascinating exhibition of photographs from the 60s and 70s by Flemish street photographer Herman Selleslags.

His subjects were often leading stars of music, sport and screen, including The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bob Marley, Tippi Hedren and of course Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg.

 

http://www.88-gallery.com

The Beatles – Abbey Road

The Photographs & Photobooks Sale, Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions
Bloomsbury House, 24 Maddox Street, London W1,
Friday 21st November 2014.

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I do wonder whether the Scottish photographer Iain Macmillan (1938-2006) thought that the final cover shot for The Beatles’ Abbey Road album would become so enduringly popular. The zebra crossing used in the shots has become a major attraction for Beatles fans from around the world, so much so that it is now Grade II listed.

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He actually said of it in 1989 “That photo’s been called an icon of the 60s. I suppose it is. I think the reason it became so popular is its simplicity. It’s a very simple, stylised shot. Also it’s a shot people can relate to. It’s a place where people can still walk.”

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I can assure you, living not far away, that they do and taking a photo on the crossing is almost de rigueur for visitors.

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Abbey Road was The Beatles’ last recorded album and Macmillan, who was a friend of Yoko Ono and John Lennon, was asked to take possible cover shots for both the front and back covers. So on the 8th August 1969, the photographer climbed a ladder in the middle of Abbey Road and for the next ten minutes took six photographs of them walking back and forth over the crossing. It was Paul McCartney who chose the fifth image to be the album’s cover. When taking the road sign for the back cover a young girl in a blue dress walked through the shot to the photographer’s annoyance. However as you know this became the shot used.

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Although an individual ‘outtake’ print of The Beatles walking ‘backwards’ was sold by Bloomsbury Auctions in May 2012 for £16,000 it is thought that this is the first time that a complete signed and numbered suite of the photographs has come under the hammer. Their estimate is £50,000-£70,000 and they will be on view from the 16th November until the auction on the Friday.

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http://www.bloomsburyauctions.com

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