‘Art for Grenfell’ Auction, Sotheby’s London

 ‘Art for Grenfell’ Auction, Sotheby’s, 34-35 New Bond Street, London W1, 16th October 2017

 

I am going to let those involved with this auction tell you more about this generous act.

Tracey Emin
Loving You More, 2015
Estimate: £25,000-35,000

First the words of film producer Hamish McAlpine and Katie Heller who have spear-headed this auction: “The edifice of Grenfell Tower stands as a reminder of the terrible failure of society to look after its poorest people.  No one should have had to suffer the trauma that these people have endured. It is only right that we should do all we can to help in any way that we can and the artists have responded with immense generosity and goodwill.”

Rachel Whiteread
Open Door, 2007
Estimate: £8,000-12,000

The local North Kensington-based charity the Rugby Portobello Trust will divide the proceeds equally among the 158 surviving families. The Trust’s CEO Mark Simms said: “Thank you on behalf of The Rugby Portobello Trust and on behalf of the families and wider community affected by the Grenfell Tower fire. The Rugby Portobello Trust has pledged to support everyone who survived this disaster and to ensure all Grenfell residents receive the support they need. The monies raised by this auction will be delivered, in their entirety, directly to the former residents by The Rugby Portobello Trust.”

 

Sotheby’s UK Chairman and auctioneer for this sale Lord Dalmeny commented: “The Grenfell disaster has had a profound effect on all of us. We are very glad to be able to do something to help provide support to the victims.”

 

Wolfgang Tillmans
Freischwimmer 193, 2009
Estimate: £120,000-180,000

Thanks are most certainly also due to the artists involved, including Tacita Dean, Tracey Emin, Rachel Howard, Sarah Lucas, Harland Miller, Wolfgang Tillmans, Yinka Shonibare, Bob & Roberta Smith, Mark Wallinger and Rachel Whiteread. Gallerist and former Notting Hill resident Sadie Coles has also donated a piece from her own collection.

 

The works will be exhibited at Sotheby’s London from 12-16 October. A small selection of sale highlights will also be exhibited from 6-8 October

 

http://www.sothebys.com

Vivien Leigh – Sotheby’s

Vivien: The Vivien Leigh Collection, Sotheby’s, New Bond Street, London W1, 26th September 2017

 

Lot 14 A Large Collection of Photographs of Vivien and Larry
Estimate £800-1,200
Courtesy of Sotheby’s

Vivien Leigh was one of the most beautiful and talented actresses to ever grace both stage and screen and now she is once again the star of the show when Sotheby’s auctions hundreds of items belonging to her in London on 26 September.

Jewellery including a mid 19th-century diamond bow brooch, a gold ring given to Vivien Leigh by her husband Laurence Olivier and a 18th-century chrysoberyl devant de corsage.
(Photo by Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

From Scarlett O’Hara in Gone With the Wind to Blanche Dubois in A Streetcar Named Desire and Karen Stone in The Roman Spring Of Mrs Stone Vivien almost reflected her own life in her films.  The feckless Scarlett ‘thinking about it tomorrow’ is Vivien in her early theatrical pursuits where she was a whirlwind jumping from (mainly) success to success then Blanche sadly shows us Vivien in her troubled years long before bi-polar personalities had been categorised.  Then finally we have Karen Stone a bewildered widow who falls for the ersatz charm of an Italian gigolo played by Warren Beatty complete with cod Italian accent.  Mrs Stone has found a new way of living and remains a sad but noble survivor.

Interior, Notley Abbey
Courtesy of Sotheby’s

When I was ten years old I saw Vivien on stage at the Kings Theatre in Glasgow in Noel Coward’s South Sea Bubble and can still recall the ‘presence’ that came across the footlights.

Lot 269 Vivien’s monogrammed luggage, all monogrammed V.L.O., and two black leather luggage labels with insert name cards printed Lady Olivier
Estimate £800-1,200
Courtesy of Sotheby’s

The items in this sale include diaries, family photographs, paintings as well as library and personal items – even the wig she wore as Blanche. I was quite surprised and delighted to see that Vivien possessed a similarly framed item exactly the same as one I recently bought in a charity shop.  It is a sketch by Ronald Searle published in Punch in January 1957 as part of his Heroes of our Time series entitled Sir Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh. – not Lady Olivier!  In it Vivien looks out from the sketch brightly and vivaciously whilst Sir Laurence is in the foreground in his Richard lll costume and make up,  including the hump, and looking out at us resignedly, cigarette clutched firmly between his fingers.

Vivien Leigh painting at an easel in a garden
Courtesy of Sotheby’s

The accompanying catalogue features many lovely photos of Vivien but then how could you take an unlovely one?

 

Lot 224 Vivien’s writing bureau, mid-18th century, acquired from Asprey in 1949
Estimate £600-900
Courtesy of Sotheby’s

 

http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/2017/vivien-leigh-collection

 

I am grateful to John Kirkwood for writing about this sale

At home in Belgrave Square

The Ballyedmond Collection, Sotheby’s London, 34-35 New Bond Street, London W1, 23rd and 24th May 2017

A large Louis XV-style gilt and patinated bronze mantel clock (est. £12,000-18,000) A pair of George IV gilt-bronze seven-light candelabra (est. £1,500-2,000)
http://www.sothebys,com

Lord Ballyedmond (1944-2014) came from a humble Irish background but became a pharmaceutical entrepreneur (Norbrook Group) and a politician both north and south of the border. His great success gained him recognition from the United States Government.

The Dining Room at Belgrave Square
http://www.sothebys,com

The contents of his London home in Belgrave Square reveal his deep love for art and antiques. The house transported his guests into a world that recalled Georgian and Regency days with a fin-de-siècle sense of lavish hospitality.  His guests were greeted by paintings, furniture, porcelain and copious amounts of silver. Dinners were his forte and much enjoyed by host and guests alike.

The Drawing Room at Belgrave Square
http://www.sothebys,com

Sotheby’s UK Chairman, Harry Dalmeny sums it up: “This collection is typically extraordinary; typical for an extraordinary man who accepted no boundaries in business, politics, art and friendship. Belgrave Square was where his ambition as a collector reached its zenith; this was the seat for a salon, where politicians and potentates from all sides of everything would find a home together at the dinner table.

http://www.sothebys .com

 

Picasso in London and Warwickshire

Woman in a Hat (Olga) by Pablo Picasso, 1935; Centre Pompidou, Paris. Musée national d’art moderne Copyright: Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2016 Photo: Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais/Rights reserved

Woman in a Hat (Olga) by Pablo Picasso, 1935;
Centre Pompidou, Paris. Musée national d’art moderne
Copyright: Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2016 Photo: Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais/Rights reserved

There is no doubting the enduring popularity of Picasso with all age groups and I thought I would share these ongoing exhibitions with you.  In the National Portrait Gallery is Picasso Portraits which is exciting in that the portraits – in various media – come from all stages of his career and while some of them are well-known others are not.

Portrait of Olga Picasso by Pablo Picasso, 1923; Private Collection Copyright: Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2016

Portrait of Olga Picasso by Pablo Picasso, 1923;
Private Collection
Copyright: Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2016

They are all of people he knew, including friends, lovers, wives and children such as  Guillaume Apollinaire, Carles Casagemas, Santiago Rusiñol, Jaume Sabartés, Jean Cocteau, Olga Picasso, Marie-Thérèse Walter, Dora Maar, Lee Miller, Françoise Gilot and Jacqueline Picasso. You will also discover caricatures and portraits inspired by earlier masters such as Rembrandt and Velazquez. (www.npg.org.uk)

 

Picasso Le peintre et son modèle IV 1970 Ink on cardboard Courtesy Omer Tiroche

Picasso
Le peintre et son modèle IV 1970
Ink on cardboard
Courtesy Omer Tiroche

At Omer Tiroche in Conduit Street you will discover Picasso on Paper (until 16th December 2016) with more than thirty works from the early 1900s onwards. They reveal how he used any piece or scrap of paper to capture his thoughts and ideas. (http://www.omertiroche.com).

Picasso Femme Debout et Femme Assise 1939 Gouache and brush and black in on lined paper Courtesy Omer Tiroche

Picasso
Femme Debout et Femme Assise 1939
Gouache and brush and black in on lined paper
Courtesy Omer Tiroche

 

 

Pablo Picasso Sprung mit dem Stab, 1957 Jumping with the pole, 1957 Blatt 8 aus Die Tauromaquie oder die Kunst des Stierkampfes Sheet 8 from Tauromachy or the Art of Bullfighting Aquatinta im Zuckeraussprengverfahren Sugar-Lift Aquatints 35 x 49,5 cm Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, © Succession Picasso Foto: Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, Horst Kolberg, ARTOTHEK

Pablo Picasso
Sprung mit dem Stab, 1957
Jumping with the pole, 1957
Blatt 8 aus Die Tauromaquie oder die Kunst des Stierkampfes
Sheet 8 from Tauromachy or the Art of Bullfighting
Aquatinta im Zuckeraussprengverfahren
Sugar-Lift Aquatints
35 x 49,5 cm
Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf,
© Succession Picasso
Foto: Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, Horst Kolberg, ARTOTHEK

Outside of London at Compton Verney there is another exhibition of Picasso on Paper (until 11th December 2016) featuring prints from the collection of the Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf.  The show gives us an ideal opportunity to look at Picasso as a printmaker with over 70 works from the 1920s-1960s and includes various media – etching, lithography, aquatint and linocut.  Although not formally trained he became very adept at printmaking and regarded it as important as painting. In all he created over 2000 prints during his lifetime.  Alongside the prints is a selection of his ceramics. They echo themes found in his prints and highlight how the relationship between the two was an important part of Picasso’s artistic output. The ceramics have been loaned by Leicester Arts and Museums Service by kind permission of The Estate of Lord and Lady Attenborough. (http://www.comptonverney.org.uk)

Pablo Picasso Kopf des Fauns, 07.02.1962 Head of the Faun Farblinolschnitt, Auflage 19/50 Colour Linocut, Edition 19/50 64 x 53 cm Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf © Succession Picasso, Foto: Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, Horst Kolberg, ARTOTHEK

Pablo Picasso
Kopf des Fauns, 07.02.1962
Head of the Faun
Farblinolschnitt, Auflage 19/50
Colour Linocut, Edition 19/50
64 x 53 cm
Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf
© Succession Picasso, Foto: Stiftung Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, Horst Kolberg, ARTOTHEK

 

Lord & Lady Attenborough: A Life in Art The Celebrated Private Collection of Picasso Ceramics Sotheby’s London, 22 November 2016

Lord & Lady Attenborough: A Life in Art
The Celebrated Private Collection of Picasso Ceramics
Sotheby’s London, 22 November 2016

Other Picasso ceramics from Lord and Lady Attenborough’s collection come under the hammer at Sotheby’s London on November 22nd (Lord & Lady Attenborough: A Life in Art The Celebrated Private Collection of Picasso Ceramics). The Attenborough’s used to visit the Madoura pottery, where Picasso worked, in the South of France on their summer holidays when staying at their summer house near the town of Vallauris and built up a collection which reflects Picasso’s artistic development in working in this medium.

Lot 30 Grand vase aux femmes nues Terre de faïence vase, 1950 numbered 8/25 height: 26in Estimate: £250,000-350,000

Lot 30
Grand vase aux femmes nues
Terre de faïence vase, 1950
numbered 8/25
height: 26in
Estimate: £250,000-350,000

Their son Michael Attenborough CBE recalls that “Vallauris was a great annual pilgrimage. In those days I remember wrapping pots up in brown paper for the drive back to England. At Old Friars, our family home, there was a huge, long table in the hall and the top surface of it would have four or five Picasso pots and underneath it there would be another four or five. Dad scattered them liberally everywhere; he adored them and just loved their extraordinary combination of beauty and wit.”(sothebys.com)

David Bowie – a Collector

Bowie/Collector,

Sotheby’s, 34-35 New Bond Street, London W1, 
Exhibition open 1–10 November 2016
Auctions 10 & 11 November 2016
'Bowie/Collector' (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby's)

‘Bowie/Collector’
(Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

Wow! Such a simple word sums up my first and lasting impression of these pieces being auctioned from Bowie’s personal art collection.  Personal is the key word in describing everything because they were his choice – he responded at some level to each of these works whether they were 20th Century British Masters, Contemporary African Art or examples of German Expressionism.  Scottish artists and Contemporary artists feature too, including the spin painting created jointly with Damien Hirst. There is even a Tintoretto.

Damien Hirst with David Bowie, Beautiful, hallo, space-boy painting, 1995 (£250,000-350,000) (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby's)

Damien Hirst with David Bowie, Beautiful, hallo, space-boy painting, 1995 (£250,000-350,000)
(Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

Then there is the large group of Memphis Milano pieces whose designs perfectly resounded with Bowie. Colour, even if minimal, certainly appears to be a unifying factor across the whole collection.  He said that he was attracted to “those who transgressed the norm, who defied convention, whether in painting or in music or anything”. This is certainly obvious and it underlines perfectly the fact that he was a serious and knowledgeable collector and that his taste like his music is both thought-provoking and highly enjoyable.

Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, Radio-Phonograph, Model no. RR126, designed 1966 (£800-1,200) (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby's)

Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, Radio-Phonograph, Model no. RR126, designed 1966 (£800-1,200)
(Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

 

Norman Catherine, Fanagalo Store (Est. £10,000-15,000) (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby's)

Norman Catherine, Fanagalo Store (Est. £10,000-15,000)
(Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

 

Winifred Nicholson, St Ives Harbour (£50,000-70,000) + Bernard Leach, Vase with 'Leaping Fish' Design (£5,000-7,000) (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby's)

Winifred Nicholson, St Ives Harbour (£50,000-70,000) + Bernard Leach, Vase with ‘Leaping Fish’ Design (£5,000-7,000)
(Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Air Power, 1984 (£2.5-3.5million) (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby's)

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Air Power, 1984 (£2.5-3.5million)
(Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Tim Whitby/ Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

 

 

sothebys.com/bowiecollector

London celebrates Asian Art

Panoramic view of the landscape and poem on a brushpot China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng (1723–35) or early Qianlong (1736–95) period, commissioned by Tang Ying (1682–1756) Porcelain with famille-rose (fencai) decoration, height 13.5 cm Private collection

Panoramic view of the landscape and poem on a brushpot
China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng (1723–35)
or early Qianlong (1736–95) period, commissioned by Tang Ying (1682–1756)
Porcelain with famille-rose (fencai) decoration, height 13.5 cm
Private collection

The 19th Asian Art in London runs from 3rd-12th of November and promises once again to bring a wide mixture of art and antiques from all periods. I would especially like to draw your attention to the special exhibition that the Oriental Ceramics Society is holding at Sotheby’s in Bond Street. Entitled ‘China without Dragons’ (3rd-9thNovember 2016) it features some two hundred ceramic pieces with the majority coming from either Japan or China.

Moonflask with carnations and asters China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Ming dynasty, Yongle period (1403–1424) Porcelain with underglaze cobalt-blue decoration, height 28 cm Private collection

Moonflask with carnations and asters
China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Ming dynasty, Yongle period (1403–1424)
Porcelain with underglaze cobalt-blue decoration, height 28 cm
Private collection

As the curator Regina Krahl (a former Society president) says: “This exhibition aims to celebrate the rich store of Chinese ceramics collected within the Oriental Ceramic Society. The fascination of an exhibition such as this lies in its phenomenal spectrum. It covers the full range from the rarest masterpieces that we might see in a major museum show to minor items that would otherwise rarely be exhibited but which display some unusual or noteworthy aspect, are particularly well made, or are simply beautiful. It is hoped that this selection will be enjoyed by specialists as well as by amateurs.”

Zodiac figure of the horse China, Henan province, Gongxian region, Tang dynasty, 7th or 8th century Earthenware with sancai glazes, height 22.2 cm Private collection

Zodiac figure of the horse
China, Henan province, Gongxian region, Tang dynasty, 7th or 8th century
Earthenware with sancai glazes, height 22.2 cm
Private collection

The Oriental Ceramics Society (OCS) was founded in Craven Hill Gardens in London in 1921 and has a long-established reputation as being the leading international society for those interested in studying and appreciating Asian Art and has over seven hundred members worldwide.

Porcelain vase decorated with yangcai overglaze enamels China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Qianlong mark and period (1736-1795) Height 47 cm Private collection

Porcelain vase decorated with yangcai overglaze enamels
China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen kilns, Qing dynasty, Qianlong mark and period (1736-1795)
Height 47 cm
Private collection

 

Archaic Jade Notched Disc Late Neolithic period – Shang period, 2000 - 1500 BC Diameter: 33.0cm Courtesy of Eskenazi

Archaic Jade Notched Disc
Late Neolithic period – Shang period, 2000 – 1500 BC
Diameter: 33.0cm
Courtesy of Eskenazi

One cannot write about Asian Art in London without mentioning the renowned firm Eskenazi and what a corker of an exhibition (Early Chinese Art from Private Collections, 3rd – 25th November 2016) they offer us this year.  It consists of twenty-four early examples of Chinese art (early jades, bone carvings, archaic bronzes and inlaid metalwork) dating from the Neolithic period to the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).  They all come from private collections and many have illustrious provenances having been previously owned by well-known collectors, including Luo Zhenyu, Pan Zuyin, Alexandre J. Argyropoulos, Edward T. Chow and Adolphe Stoclet.  Many of the items have a common theme in that they feature animal decoration or animal motifs. Alongside this they are showing works by the well-known contemporary Chinese ink painter Zeng Xiaojun (b.1954) in what is his first European show.

Archaic Bronze Wine Vessel and Cover (You) Shang or Early Western Zhou period, 11th century BC Height (to top of knop): 27.4cm Weight (without handle): 3.80kg Courtesy of Eskenazi

Archaic Bronze Wine Vessel and Cover (You)
Shang or Early Western Zhou period, 11th century BC
Height (to top of knop): 27.4cm
Weight (without handle): 3.80kg
Courtesy of Eskenazi

 

Gilt-bronze, Agate and Turquoise Bear Han period, 206 BC - 220 AD Height: 10.6cm Courtesy of Eskenazi

Gilt-bronze, Agate and Turquoise Bear
Han period, 206 BC – 220 AD
Height: 10.6cm
Courtesy of Eskenazi

 

Bonsai I Ink and colour on paper Dimensions: 180cm by 138cm Signed: Zeng Xiaojun Artist’s seal: Painted by Zeng Xiaojun Courtesy of Eskenazi

Bonsai I
Ink and colour on paper
Dimensions: 180cm by 138cm
Signed: Zeng Xiaojun
Artist’s seal: Painted by Zeng Xiaojun
Courtesy of Eskenazi

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ocs-london.com

http://www.sothebys.com

http://www.eskenazi.co.uk

Sotheby’s at Chatsworth

Beyond Limits – Sotheby’s at Chatsworth, Chatsworth, Derbyshire, until 30th October 2016

Zaha Hadid Lilas, 2007 Courtesy of Sotheby's

Zaha Hadid
Lilas, 2007
Courtesy of Sotheby’s

Sotheby’s annual Beyond Limits has the perfect setting in the glorious gardens of Chatsworth, the family home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire and so it is no wonder that it has become a popular platform for the display and sale of both modern and contemporary outdoor sculpture.  Pride of place this year is given to Zaha Hadid’s sculpturally stunning Lilas pavilion, which was created for London’s Serpentine Gallery’s summer party in 2007.

Chatsworth’s own Art Out Loud festival takes place between 23rd -25th September

 

http://www.chatsworth.org/attractions-and-events/events/chatsworth-festival

 

www.sothebys.com